Joshua Furst - Revolutionaries (Corte Madera Store)

Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 4:00pm

Fred is the sole offspring of Lenny Snyder, the famous (or notorious) pied piper of the counterculture, and in middle age he hates being reminded of it. But neither can he ignore any longer his psychedelically bizarre childhood. From infancy, for instance, he was called Freedom (in fact his given name) not only by those who should have known him but also by members of the burgeoning movement led by his father, who happily exploited having his wife and his toddling, then walking and talking, and finally observant son in tow. Thanks to Fred, this charismatic, brilliant, volatile ringmaster is as captivating in these pages as he was to his devoted disciples back then. We watch Lenny organize hippies and intellectuals, stage magnificent stunts, and gradually lose his magnetic confidence and leading role as the sixties start slipping away. He demands loyalty but gives none back in return, a man who preaches love but treats his family with almost reflexive cruelty. And Fred remembers all of it--the chaos, the spite, the affection. A kaleidoscopic saga, Revolutionaries is at once a profound allegory for America--where we've been and where we're going--and a deeply intimate portrait of a father and son who define our times.

Joshua Furst is the author of Short People and The Sabotage Café, as well as several plays that have been produced in New York, where for a number of years he taught in the public schools. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, he's the recipient of a Michener Fellowship, the Chicago Tribune's Nelson Algren Award, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and Ledig House. He lives in New York City and teaches at Columbia University.

Revolutionaries: A novel Cover Image
$26.95
ISBN: 9780307271143
Availability: Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Knopf - April 16th, 2019

In his second novel, the acclaimed author of The Sabotage Café leads us on a long, strange trip through the heart of the sixties and beyond, as seen through the eyes of the revolution's poster child.


51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Left Coast Writers®: Natalie Galli - The Girl Who Said No (Corte Madera Store)

Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 7:00pm

An eighteen-year-old woman named Franca Viola made history in 1966 as one of the first "#metoo" heroines of modern times when she refused to go along with a centuries-old forcible marriage custom in Sicily. Having endured kidnap and rape, she publicly defied the expectation that she would marry the rapist to "restore her broken honor." A social uproar occurred throughout the island ― and beyond.

In Natalie Galli's The Girl Who Said No, Viola's remarkable story unfolds when the author arrives in Palermo to search for this brave heroine, with little more than the memory of a tiny article she had spotted two decades prior. Galli wanted to know: whatever had become of this courageous girl who had overturned an ancient, entrenched tradition?

The riveting events after Franca pressed charges with the police form the core of this gripping memoir. Viola was subjected to public taunting whenever she appeared on the streets of her town; Mafia-orchestrated bullying threatened her entire family. Galli traced the dramatic tale to its conclusion, in spite of initial warnings from her own relatives not to break the Sicilian code of silence.

Throughout her search for the enigmatic Franca, Galli shares her own poignant and hilarious observations about a vibrant culture steeped in contradictions and paradoxes. Does she succeed in locating the elusive proto-feminist whose case forever changed Italian culture and history? Travel along on Galli's engaging odyssey to find out.

Natalie Galli, a San Francisco native of Italian background, has penned two illustrated children's books for Sunbath Studios: Ciao Meow and Spin The Hound Lost and Found, A Tale of the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake. She edited a third Sunbath Studios publication: LeeLee The Lizard Wants A Pizza. Her writings have been anthologized in Italy, A Love Story and in four volumes of Travelers' Tales, three of which were awarded gold and silver prizes by the Bay Area Travel Writers. She has worked as an editor and proofreader for Burning Books, as a columnist for The Berkeley Monthly, and as a freelance contributor to the San Francisco Chronicle. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

The Girl Who Said No: A Search in Sicily Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9781609521721
Availability: Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Travelers' Tales Guides - April 23rd, 2019

An eighteen-year-old woman named Franca Viola made history in 1966 as one of the first "#metoo" heroines of modern times, when she refused to go along with a centuries-old forcible marriage custom in Sicily. Having endured kidnap and rape, she publicly defied the expectation that she would marry the rapist to "restore her broken honor." A social uproar occurred throughout the island ― and beyond.


51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Class: Connie Josefs - You Had To Be There - Writing Scene in Memoir (Corte Madera Store)

Sunday, August 18, 2019 - 10:00am to 1:00pm
photo of Connie Josefs

Sunday, August 18, 2019 • 10:00am – 1:00pm • $95 

Use this link to register for You Had To Be There - Writing Scene in Memoir, or use the link at the bottom of the page to register for the 4-class series.

“I find that scene making is my natural way of marking the past.” —Virginia Woolf  Scene is the building block of narrative; it brings the reader into the immediate experience of a story. But how do we determine when to move from scene to exposition? This workshop will examine the varied effects of scene and exposition in memoir and explore how they are used effectively to bring personal experience to the page.

Connie Josefs is a writer, teacher, and writing coach who has worked extensively with writers - particularly older writers - to write and publish their memoirs. She has taught writing at the University of New Mexico, the Taos Writers Conference, and Santa Monica College. She has also been a writer and story analyst for film and television.

Use the link below to register for the 4-class series,The Craft of Writing Memoir, at a reduced price of $350. Includes:

Who’s Talking? The Narrator in Memoir                                            Sat Aug 17   10am - 1pm
The Way They Were • Writing Believable Characters in Memoir     Sat Aug 17     3pm - 6pm
You Had To Be There • Writing Scene in Memoir                              Sun Aug 18  10am - 1pm
The Shape of Time in Memoir                                                             Sun Aug 18    3pm - 6pm

51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Class: Connie Josefs - The Shape of Time in Memoir (Corte Madera Store)

Sunday, August 18, 2019 - 3:00pm to 6:00pm
photo of Connie Josefs

Sunday, August 18, 2019 • 3:00 – 6:00 pm • $95

Use this link to register for The Shape of Time in Memoir, or use the link at the bottom of the page to register for the 4-class series.

“You don’t look back along time but down through it, like water. Sometimes this comes to the surface, sometimes that... Nothing goes away.” —Margaret Atwood  Time can be one of the the most challenging aspects of memoir. We view events from two vantage points: then and now. How do writers accommodate this shifting narrative stance? How do we effectively utilize hindsight to gain access to narratives of the past? This workshop will explore how memoirists organize time, voice and point of view to structure scenes and create coherence.

Connie Josefs is a writer, teacher, and writing coach who has worked extensively with writers - particularly older writers - to write and publish their memoirs. She has taught writing at the University of New Mexico, the Taos Writers Conference, and Santa Monica College. She has also been a writer and story analyst for film and television.

Use the link below to register for the 4-class series,The Craft of Writing Memoir, at a reduced price of $350. Includes:

Who’s Talking? The Narrator in Memoir                                            Sat Aug 17   10am - 1pm
The Way They Were • Writing Believable Characters in Memoir     Sat Aug 17     3pm - 6pm
You Had To Be There • Writing Scene in Memoir                              Sun Aug 18  10am - 1pm
The Shape of Time in Memoir                                                             Sun Aug 18    3pm - 6pm

51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Chris Algieri - The Fighter's Kitchen (San Francisco Ferry Building Store)

Tuesday, August 20, 2019 - 6:00pm

Ever wonder how professional MMA fighters in the UFC prepare their bodies for fights? The real training often starts in the kitchen, where the right meals at the right times can give fighters everything they need to be ready for their next match.

Fighters fuel their bodies with precise nutrients delivered at specific times to achieve their functional physiques--and now you can too. The Fighter's Kitchen provides expert guidance on what and when to eat, and it helps you understand how our bodies use what we eat to burn fat and build lean, strong muscle. Through phased weekly meal plans, expert insight on how and when to take full advantage of your body's muscle-building capabilities, and 100 delicious recipes, you'll find yourself looking ring ready even if you have no plans to step into one.

Chris Algieri is a former World Boxing Organization (WBO) junior welterweight boxing champion, ISKA world welterweight kickboxing champion, and WKA world super welterweight world kickboxing champion with more than 13 years of professional fighting experience. He has a bachelor's degree in health care management from Stony Brook University and a master's degree in clinical nutrition from the New York Institute of Technology. Chris is also a certified sports nutritionist through International Society of Sport Nutrition. He's spoken on topics related to human performance and nutrition at various sports performance conferences, seminars, and summits. Across Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, he has more than 125,000 followers, and he sometimes posts recipes and cooking tips. Chris is currently the head performance nutrition coach at Stony Brook, where he's worked with 500 Division I athletes in 16 different sports on a daily basis. He hasn't hung up his boxing gloves just yet, but until his next fight, he helps fighters with their nutritional needs before their next competition.

The Fighter's Kitchen: 100 Muscle-Building, Fat Burning Recipes, with Meal Plans to Sculpt Your Warrior Cover Image
$19.99
ISBN: 9781465483737
Availability: Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: Alpha - June 4th, 2019

100 muscle-building, fat-burning recipes, with meal plans to sculpt your warrior body

Ever wonder how professional MMA fighters in the UFC prepare their bodies for fights? The real training often starts in the kitchen, where the right meals at the right times can give fighters everything they need to be ready for their next match.


1 Ferry Building
San Francisco, CA 94111

William Alsup - Won Over (San Francisco Ferry Building Store)

Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - 6:00pm

What was it like growing up white in Mississippi as the Civil Rights Movement exploded in the 1950s and '60s. How did white children reconcile the decency and fairness taught by their parents with the indecency and unfairness of the Mississippi Way of Life, the euphemism applied to the pervasive Jim Crow. How did the Civil Rights Movement influence white kids coming of age in the most segregated place in America?

Won Over, a memoir, examines these questions as it traces the journey of United States District Judge William Alsup, born white in 1945 to hard-working parents in Mississippi. They believed in segregation. But they also taught their children fairness and decency and therein lay the conflict, a struggle at the core of the human predicament in the South. As Won Over recalls near its outset, the author's earliest doubt about the system came at age twelve when what he'd thought stood as an abandoned shack at the bottom of a sand quarry turned out to be a school for black kids, whom we saw playing in the mud outside its door.

At the end, Won Over reflects on a 1966 challenge by the author and his college roommate to the Mississippi Speaker Ban, an official rule against any "controversial" speaker coming onto a college campus in Mississippi, a rule used to quash their invitation to the state president of the NAACP to speak at their college, Mississippi State University. After a tense showdown, the roommates won that challenge. In January 1967, Aaron Henry became the first black ever to speak on a white college campus in Mississippi, receiving a standing ovation.

The memoir traces the influences that drew the author from traditional Southern attitudes toward a color-blind ideal. Those influences included his older sister, Willanna, his closest circle of friends, a charismatic mentor in college, and the moral force of the Civil Rights Movement. Won Over recounts their steps along that journey -- a counter protest to a John Birch Society billboard calling for the impeachment of Chief Justice Earl Warren; meeting personally with the brother of slain leader Medgar Evers to convey condolences; a letter to the editor of the statewide paper on behalf of his circle of friends declaring "We are for civil rights for Negroes"; joining his college roommate in a rally at Tougaloo College to support the Meredith March Against Racism; and going to the Liberty Baptist Church in Chicago to hear Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. exhort the faithful in their summer-long protest against housing and employment discrimination.

In 1967, William Alsup went on to Harvard Law School, then to clerk for Justice William O. Douglas. He briefly practiced civil rights law in Mississippi before moving to San Francisco, where he became a trial attorney and, in 1999, received an appointment as United States District Judge.

Won Over: Reflections of a Federal Judge on His Journey from Jim Crow Mississippi Cover Image
$27.95
ISBN: 9781588383426
Availability: Usually Ships in 1-5 Days
Published: NewSouth Books - March 2019

What was it like growing up white in Mississippi as the Civil Rights Movement exploded in the 1950s and '60s. How did white children reconciled the decency and fairness taught by their parents with the indecency and unfairness of the Mississippi Way of Life, the euphemism applied to the pervasive Jim Crow.


1 Ferry Building
San Francisco, CA 94111

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