POSTPONED: Barton Gellman - Dark Mirror: Edward Snowden and the American Surveillance State (Corte Madera Store)

Friday, May 29, 2020 - 7:00pm

Please note: This event has been postponed due to concerns for the health and well-being of our community. For updates on this event and for additional event information, please subscribe to our e-newsletter.

Edward Snowden chose three journalists to tell the stories in his Top Secret trove of NSA documents: Barton Gellman of The Washington Post, Glenn Greenwald of The Guardian, and filmmaker Laura Poitras, all of whom would share the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Poitras went on to direct the Oscar-winning Citizenfour. Greenwald cast himself as a pugilist on Snowden's behalf.

Gellman, whose relationship with his source was more turbulent, took his own path. Snowden and his documents were the beginning, not the end, of a story he had prepared his whole life to tell. More than two decades as a top investigative journalist armed him with deep sources in national security and high technology. Gellman's reporting continued to unlock new puzzles long after the headlines began to fade. Fresh discoveries in this book touch us all.

Dark Mirror is a true-life spy tale, told with authority and an inside view of extraordinary events. Within it is a compelling portrait of investigative journalism under pressure of legal threats, government investigations and foreign intelligence agencies intent on stealing Gellman’s files. The NSA director secretly calls for a federal raid to seize the leaked documents. The author finds his name in one of those documents—as the target of a previous leak investigation. Google warns him that “state sponsored attackers” are trying to compromise his account. His tablet is hacked before his eyes as he leaves the set of a Sunday news broadcast. Customized malware is sent to his computer. Sophisticated impostors approach him with counterfeit documents, attempting to divert or discredit his work. Throughout Dark Mirror, Gellman wages an escalating battle against unknown adversaries who force him to mimic their tradecraft in self-defense.

With the vivid and insightful style that marked Gellman's bestselling Angler, Dark Mirror is an inside account of the surveillance-industrial revolution and its discontents. Along the way, and with the benefit of hindsight, it tells the full story of a government leak unrivaled in drama since All the President's Men.

Barton Gellman is a Pulitzer Prize and Emmy Award-winning journalist. Since 2013 he has been a senior fellow at the Century Foundation. During 21 years at the Washington Post he served tours as legal, military, diplomatic, and foreign correspondent. He has taught courses at Princeton on nonfiction writing, investigative reporting, and national security secrecy. His bestselling Angler: The Cheney Vice Presidency won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and was a New York Times Best Book of 2008.

51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

POSTPONED: Special Event for Kids: Lea Lyon - Ready to Fly (Corte Madera Store)

Sunday, May 31, 2020 - 4:00pm

Please note: This event has been postponed due to concerns for the health and well-being of our community. For updates on this event and for additional event information, please subscribe to our e-newsletter.

Ready to Fly is the true story of Sylvia Townsend, an African American girl who falls in love with ballet after seeing Swan Lake on TV. Although there aren’t many ballet schools that will accept a girl like Sylvia in the 1950s, her local bookmobile provides another possibility. A librarian helps Sylvia find a book about ballet and the determined seven-year-old, with the help of her new books, starts teaching herself the basics of classical ballet. Soon Sylvia learns how to fly—how to dance—and how to dare to dream.

Lyrical, and easy-to-read text paired with bright, appealing illustrations make Ready to Fly perfect for aspiring ballerinas everywhere who are ready to leap and to spread their wings.

Includes a foreword from Sylvia Townsend, a brief history of the bookmobile, an author’s note, and a further reading list.

Lea Lyon always wanted to create children’s books when she was a little girl. Now, after several other careers, Lyon is living out her dream. Ready to Fly is the first children’s book she’s written. She has illustrated six award-winning picture books, including Say Something by Peggy Moss and Keep Your Ear on the Ball by Genevieve Petrillo. Her book Lailah’s Lunchbox by Reem Faruqi was named an ALA Notable Book. You can visit her at www.lealyon.com.

51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Class: Jerry Frohmader - The Great American Songbook: Where Have All the Tunes Gone?

Tuesday, June 2, 2020 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Four Tuesdays; June 2 - June 23 • 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm • $125

Savor the unforgettable music of Gershwin, Porter, Rodgers & Hart, Mercer & Berlin, as we discuss the careers and musical styles of America’s most popular songwriters from the 20’s to the 60’s. Enjoy such favorites as “I Got Rhythm,” “You’re The Top,” “White Christmas,” "My Funny Valentine," "Somethings Gotta Give," as well as "Rhapsody in Blue," and "Porgy & Bess."  The class includes live, recorded music and video.

An accomplished musician, Jerry Frohmader is a composer, performer, teacher and arts administrator. He has designed music for multimedia projects and the web, and he  produces music for television commercials, videos and films. Jerry's depth of knowledge and enthusiastic teaching style has earned him a loyal following in Marin. 

51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

Sasha Abramsky - Little Wonder: The Fabulous Story of Lottie Dod, the World's First Female Sports Superstar (San Francisco Ferry Building Store)

Tuesday, June 2, 2020 - 6:00pm

Little Wonder: The Fabulous Story of Lottie Dod, the World's First Female Sports Superstar is a biography of a truly extraordinary sports figure who blazed trails of glory in the last decades of the nineteenth and first decade of the twentieth centuries. Dod was the third woman to win the Ladies' Championships at the Wimbledon tennis tournament. She did so for the first time in 1887, at the ludicrously young age of fifteen. She remains today the youngest person ever to have won a singles trophy in what would come to be known as the big-four Grand Slam tennis tournaments.

Dod won Wimbledon five times, grew bored with competitive tennis, and moved on to myriad other sports. She became the world's leading female ice skater and tobogganist, perfecting her talents in St. Moritz, Switzerland; befriended Elizabeth Main, the most skilled female mountaineer of the age, and joined her in summiting many of Switzerland's and Norway's most difficult mountains; became an endurance bicyclist; played hockey for England; won the British ladies' golf championship in 1904; and finally, in 1908, took the Olympic silver medal in archery in the London Olympics.

In her time, she had a huge following, with fans coming out by the thousands to cheer her on. She was feted by the media, and repeatedly profiled by the top sports journals of the day. Had Dod lived in a different age, this fame would have followed her throughout her life. But Dod's years of glory occurred just before the rise of cinema, radio, and other electronic media. By the outset of World War I, she was largely a forgotten figure; she died alone and without fanfare in 1960.

Little Wonder brings this remarkable woman's story to life, contextualizing it against a backdrop of rapid social change and tectonic shifts in the status of women in society. Dod was born into a world in which even upper-class women such as herself could not vote, were restricted in owning property, and were assumed to be fragile and delicate. True, the monarch was a queen, Victoria; but Victoria's reign was hardly a bastion of feminist progress. Women of Lottie Dod's class were expected not to work and to definitely get married. Dod turned that equation on its head; she never married and never had children, instead putting heart and soul into training to be the best athlete she could possibly be.

Dod was one of the pioneers who paved the way for the likes of Billie Jean King, Serena Williams, and the top female athletes of today. She accepted no limits, no glass ceilings, believed she could compete with the top men in whatever sport she set her sights on, and always refused to compromise.

Sasha Abramsky is a freelance journalist whose work has appeared over the past twenty-five years in major newspapers and magazines in the United States and United Kingdom. These include the Nation, the Atlantic, the New Yorker online, Rolling Stone, Mother Jones, the New York Times, the Guardian, the Independent, the Observer, and the New Statesman. He has written widely about poverty and inequality; hunger; mass incarceration; the treatment of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers; along with book reviews, cultural essays, and travel writing. Little Wonder is Abramsky’s ninth book. He teaches writing part-time at the University of California, Davis, and lives in Sacramento with his wife and two children.

1 Ferry Building
San Francisco, CA 94111

Zeyn Joukhadar - The Thirty Names of Night (San Francisco Ferry Building Store)

Wednesday, June 3, 2020 - 6:00pm

Five years after a suspicious fire killed his ornithologist mother, a closeted Syrian American trans boy sheds his birth name and searches for a new one. He has been unable to paint since his mother’s ghost has begun to visit him each evening. As his grandmother’s sole caretaker, he spends his days cooped up in their apartment, avoiding his neighborhood masjid, his estranged sister, and even his best friend (who also happens to be his longtime crush). The only time he feels truly free is when he slips out at night to paint murals on buildings in the once-thriving Manhattan neighborhood known as Little Syria.

One night, he enters the abandoned community house and finds the tattered journal of a Syrian American artist named Laila Z, who dedicated her career to painting the birds of North America. She famously and mysteriously disappeared more than sixty years before, but her journal contains proof that both his mother and Laila Z encountered the same rare bird before their deaths. In fact, Laila Z’s past is intimately tied to his mother’s—and his grandmother’s—in ways he never could have expected. Even more surprising, Laila Z’s story reveals the histories of queer and transgender people within his own community that he never knew. Realizing that he isn’t and has never been alone, he has the courage to officially claim a new name: Nadir, an Arabic name meaning rare.

As unprecedented numbers of birds are mysteriously drawn to the New York City skies, Nadir enlists the help of his family and friends to unravel what happened to Laila Z and the rare bird his mother died trying to save. Following his mother’s ghost, he uncovers the silences kept in the name of survival by his own community, his own family, and within himself, and discovers the family that was there all along.

Featuring Zeyn Joukhadar’s signature “magical and heart-wrenching” (The Christian Science Monitor) storytelling, The Thirty Names of Night is a timely exploration of how we all search for and ultimately embrace who we are.

Zeyn Joukhadar is the author of The Map of Salt and Stars. He is a member of the Radius of Arab American Writers (RAWI) and of American Mensa. Joukhadar’s writing has appeared in Salon, The Paris Review, The Kenyon Review, and elsewhere and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and the Best of the Net. The Map of Salt and Stars was a 2018 Middle East Book Award winner in Youth Literature and a 2018 Goodreads Choice Award Finalist in Historical Fiction and was shortlisted for the Wilbur Smith Adventure Writing Prize. He has been an artist in residence at the Montalvo Arts Center, the Fes Medina Project, Beit al-Atlas, and the Arab American National Museum.

1 Ferry Building
San Francisco, CA 94111

Marianne Ingheim - Out of Love (Corte Madera Store)

Saturday, June 6, 2020 - 4:00pm

We all tell ourselves stories about who we are. Many of these stories are self-critical and disempowering. Through the practice of self-compassion, we can rewrite these stories and become more authentic and powerful versions of ourselves—transforming not only our own lives but also the lives of those around us.

In short and personal pieces, Marianne Ingheim tells the story of how the practice of self-compassion has changed her life in ways big and small, helping her unlearn harsh self-criticism, survive multiple tragedies, and live more authentically. In the wake of a breast cancer diagnosis and her husband’s suicide, she discovers the power of self-compassionate storytelling and finds belonging within herself—and in doing so, she learns how to manage anxiety and stress, how to be authentic in relationships, and how to let go of comparison and be truly creative.

Through stories and journaling prompts, Out of Love: Finding Your Way Back to Self-Compassion aims to inspire readers to unlearn the self-critical patterns holding them hostage—and begin to live a happier, more courageous life.

Marianne Ingheim is a Danish-Norwegian American writer, teacher, and PhD student at California Institute of Integral Studies. She lives in the San Francisco Bay Area. For more information, please visit www.marianneingheim.com.

51 Tamal Vista Blvd
Corte Madera, CA 94925

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