Virtual Events

Sarah Sentilles with Anthony Doerr - Stranger Care (Online Event)

Wednesday, June 2, 2021 - 5:30pm


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Book Passage Presents

Wed., June 2, 2021 • 5:30pm PT • Live • Online

In conversation with Anthony Doerr • Signed bookplates available!

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This event will be broadcast live and does not require registration to attend. To view, click the "Watch Here" button at the time of the event, or subscribe to our e-newsletter to receive a ten-minute reminder.
 

The moving story of what one woman learned from fostering a newborn—about injustice, about making mistakes, about how to better love and protect people beyond our immediate kin.

May you always feel at home.

After their decision not to have a biological child, Sarah Sentilles and her husband, Eric, decide to adopt via the foster care system. Despite knowing that the system’s goal is the child’s reunification with the birth family, Sarah opens their home to a flurry of social workers who question them, evaluate them, and ultimately prepare them to welcome a child into their lives—even if it means most likely having to give the child back. After years of starts and stops, and endless navigation of the complexities and injustices of the foster care system, a phone call finally comes: a three-day-old baby girl named Coco, in immediate need of a foster family. Sarah and Eric bring this newborn stranger home.

“You were never ours,” Sarah tells Coco, “yet we belong to each other.”

A love letter to Coco and to the countless children like her, Stranger Care chronicles Sarah’s discovery of what it means to mother—in this case, not just a vulnerable infant but the birth mother who loves her, too. Ultimately, Coco’s story reminds us that we depend on family, and that family can take different forms. With prose that Nick Flynn has called “fearless, stirring, rhythmic,” Sentilles lays bare an intimate, powerful story with universal concerns: How can we care for and protect one another? How do we ensure a more hopeful future for life on this planet? And if we’re all related—tree, bird, star, person—how might we better live?

Sarah Sentilles is the author of Draw Your Weapons, Breaking Up with God, A Church of Her Own, and Taught by America. A graduate of Yale University and Harvard Divinity School, she lives in Idaho’s Wood River Valley.

Anthony Doerr is the author of The Shell Collector, About Grace, Memory Wall, Four Seasons in Rome, and All the Light We Cannot See. His new novel, Cloud Cuckoo Land, will be published in September 2021. Doerr's fiction has won awards that include the Pulitzer Prize, the Carnegie Medal, and five O. Henry Prizes. Doerr lives in Boise with his wife and two sons.

 

Sarah Sentilles photo by Gia Goodrich at VEV STUDIOS; Anthony Doerr photo by Ulf Andersen

 

Andrew McCarthy with Don George - Brat: An '80s Story (Online Event)

Sunday, May 23, 2021 - 4:00pm

Sunday, May 23rd, 2021

Live • Online • 4:00pm PT • $40

In conversation with Don George


Purchase a ticket for this event and receive a complimentary copy of Brat, delivered right to your door!

 

Fans of Patti Smith's Just Kids and Rob Lowe's Stories I Only Tell My Friends will love this beautifully written, entertaining, and emotionally honest memoir by an actor, director, and author who found his start as an '80s Brat pack member.

Most people know Andrew McCarthy from his movie roles in Pretty in Pink, St. Elmo's Fire, Weekend at Bernie's, and Less than Zero, and as a charter member of Hollywood's Brat Pack. That iconic group of ingenues and heartthrobs included Rob Lowe, Molly Ringwald, Emilio Estevez, and Demi Moore, and has come to represent both a genre of film and an era of pop culture. In his memoir Brat: An '80s Story, McCarthy focuses his gaze on that singular moment in time. The result is a revealing look at coming of age in a maelstrom, reckoning with conflicted ambition, innocence, addiction, and masculinity. New York City of the 1980s is brought to vivid life in these pages, from scoring loose joints in Washington Square Park to skipping school in favor of the dark revival houses of the Village where he fell in love with the movies that would change his life. Filled with personal revelations of innocence lost to heady days in Hollywood with John Hughes and an iconic cast of characters, Brat is a surprising and intimate story of an outsider caught up in a most unwitting success.

Since starring in the movies he recounts throughout Brat, Andrew McCarthy has become a director, an award-winning travel writer, and a bestselling author. He has directed more than eighty hours of television, including Orange in the New Black, The Blacklist, Gossip Girl, and many others. For a dozen years he served as editor at large at National Geographic Traveler, and his award-winning travel writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, TIME, and elsewhere. He is the author a travel memoir, The Longest Way Home, and a young-adult novel, Just Fly Away—both New York Times bestsellers.

Don George is the author of The Way of Wanderlust: The Best Travel Writing of Don George and of Lonely Planet's Guide to Travel Writing and the editor of ten anthologies, including A Moveable Feast, The Kindness of Strangers, Better Than Fiction, and An Innocent Abroad. George is Editor at Large for National Geographic Traveler, where he writes feature articles and the monthly Trip Lit column. He is also Editor of BBC Travel's literary travel column, Chance Encounters.

 

Andrew McCarthy photo by Jill Greenberg; Don George photo courtesy of author

 

Daniel Howell with John Green - You Will Get Through This Night (Online Event)

Sunday, May 16, 2021 - 4:00pm


Sunday, May 16th, 2021

Online • 4:00pm PT/7:00pm ET

By purchasing a copy of You Will Get Through This Night, you will be provided access to attend this virtual event prior to May 16th.

Signed book plates are available while supplies last.

If you have not yet received access to the event, please contact acusack@bookpassage.com

 

Join Daniel Howell in conversation with John Green for an intimate discussion about Dan's life, time on the internet, and why this mental health book means so much. 

Daniel Howell is one of the world’s most popular entertainers with millions of followers around the world that know him from comedy videos, stage shows, radio, and #1 bestselling books. Known for his self-deprecating and sarcastic humour—as well as making jokes at his own expense—he has also spoken about his real struggles with depression and sexuality and it is this mix of entertainment with the profound and deeply personal that has given Dan a devoted following as well as becoming an activist for mental health and LGBT+ issues.

John Green is the award-winning, #1 bestselling author of books including Looking for Alaska, The Fault in Our Stars, and Turtles All the Way Down. His books have received many accolades, including a Printz Medal, a Printz Honor, and an Edgar Award. John has twice been a finalist for the LA Times Book Prize and was selected by TIME magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. He is also the writer and host of the critically acclaimed podcast The Anthropocene Reviewed. With his brother, Hank, John has co-created many online video projects, including Vlogbrothers and the educational channel Crash Course. He lives with his family in Indianapolis, Indiana. You can visit John online at johngreenbooks.com. John’s upcoming essay collection, The Anthropocene Reviewed, can be preordered here or join John on his book tour here.


Daniel Howell photo by Sarah M. Lee; John Green photo by Marina Waters

 

Janna L. Goodwin with Lavinia Spalding - The End of the World Notwithstanding (Online Event)

Wednesday, May 19, 2021 - 6:00pm


Wednesday, May 19, 2021 • 6:00pm PT • Online • Live

In conversation with Lavinia Spalding

Introduction by Larry Habegger, Executive Editor of Travelers' Tales


 

Rife with misadventures, brushes with death, and moments of existential insight, The End of the World Notwithstanding is a hilarious yet reflective look at the emotional experiences that make everyday life exciting—and the physical ones that remind us we're lucky to be alive.

I'm traveling alone, renting a cabin at a normally tranquil spot—that's called foreshadowing—on the banks of the Big Laramie River at the edge of the Medicine Bow National Forest.

So begins Janna L. Goodwin's lighthearted collection of nail-biting stories, all true, and all of which fill the listener with wonder ... as in, "I wonder how any of us survives?"

Encounters with wildfire, insects, house pets, weather, gravity, predators, bullies, and the most potent force of all—fear itself—unfold in remote landscapes of the American West (and Midwest); on the neon-splashed sidewalks of Hollywood; at a Catskills summer camp for actors; in the lavish apartment of a famous senator; in a Hawaiian beach condo; on the side of a mountain above the Mediterranean Sea; and far beneath the streets of Paris. Goodwin looks for and ultimately finds meaning (if not security) in a clear-eyed acknowledgment of our shared, human condition—and in laughter.

Janna L. Goodwin teaches in the Communication department and the Mile High MFA program at Regis University in Denver, Colorado. She grew up in Wyoming, performed improv comedy for a few years with Moving Violations and other groups in the Los Angeles area, and—after living for a year in France—studied theatre at the National Shakespeare Conservatory in New York. She earned her BA in Film and Music from Hampshire College and her doctoral degree in Communication from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her plays have been produced by independent theatre companies on the East Coast and in Colorado. She has created and directed ensemble comedies for many years, including The House Not Touched by Death (Pilgrim Theatre Collective; the Ko Festival of Performance) and Just Pretend Everything Is Perfectly Normal (Playwright Theatre). Her most recent solo show, You Are Reminded That Your Safety is Your Own Responsibility, premiered at the United Solo Theatre Festival in New York, toured a bit, and provided the original material for this, her first book.

Lavinia Spalding is the author of Writing Away and co-author of With a Measure of Grace and This Immeasurable Place. Her writing appears in such publications as AFAR, Tin House, Longreads, Yoga Journal, Sunset, Ms., the San Francisco Chronicle, and The Guardian, and has been widely anthologized. Her work has won gold Lowell Thomas and Solas awards and has been recognized by The Best American Travel Writing and written about in the New Yorker and The New York Times. She lives with her family in New Orleans and on Cape Cod.

 

Available in hardcover and paperback

 

Ian Manuel - My Time Will Come (Online Event)

Sunday, May 16, 2021 - 4:00pm

Conversations with Authors

Sunday, May 16, 2021 • 4:00pm PT • Live • Online



Conversations with Authors is our free online event series produced with Extended Session! Join us throughout the week for new chats with different authors.

 

The inspiring story of activist and poet Ian Manuel, who at the age of fourteen was sentenced to life in prison. He survived eighteen years in solitary confinement—through his own determination and dedication to art—until he was freed as part of an incredible crusade by the Equal Justice Initiative.

“Ian is magic. His story is difficult and heartbreaking, but he takes us places we need to go to understand why we must do better. He survives by relying on a poetic spirit, an unrelenting desire to succeed, to recover, and to love. Ian’s story says something hopeful about our future.” —Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy

The United States is the only country in the world that sentences thirteen- and fourteen-year-old offenders—mostly youth of color—to life in prison without parole. In 1991, Ian Manuel, then fourteen, was sentenced to life without parole for a non-homicide crime. In a botched mugging attempt with some older boys, he shot a young white mother of two in the face. But as Bryan Stevenson, attorney and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, has insisted, none of us should be judged by only the worst thing we have ever done.

Capturing the fullness of his humanity, here is Manuel’s powerful testimony of growing up homeless in a neighborhood riddled with poverty, gang violence, and drug abuse—and of his efforts to rise above his circumstances, only to find himself, partly through his own actions, imprisoned for two-thirds of his life, eighteen years of which were spent in solitary confinement. Here is the story of how he endured the savagery of the United States prison system, and how his victim, an extraordinary woman, forgave him and bravely advocated for his freedom, which was achieved by an Equal Justice Initiative push to address the barbarism of our judicial system and bring about “just mercy.”

Full of unexpected twists and turns as it describes a struggle for redemption, My Time Will Come is a paean to the capacity of the human will to transcend adversity through determination and art—in Ian Manuel’s case, through his dedication to writing poetry.

Ian Manuel lives in New York City. He is a motivational speaker at schools and social organizations nationwide.

 

Ian Manuel photo by Kara Baker

 

Online Class: Ying Compestine - How to Write a Children's Book and Get It Published

Saturday, June 19, 2021 - 10:00am to 12:30pm

How to Write a Children's Book and Get It Published
Sat., June 19, 2021 • 10:00am-12:30pm PT

How to Edit Your Work Into a Bestselling Book
Sat., June 19, 2021 • 1:30-4:00pm PT

Hosted via Zoom • $85 each • $150 for both

REGISTER FOR "CHILDREN'S BOOKS"  REGISTER FOR "EDIT YOUR WORK"  REGISTER FOR BOTH

 

In How to Edit Your Work Into a Bestselling Book, Ying will share with you her processes of editing her own bestselling books. You will learn how to build a story arc, create memorable characters and vivid settings, and make every word count. She will also take you through the process of how to get your book published, and finding a good agent and a publisher.

In How to Write a Children's Book and Get It Published, Ying will introduce you to the different genres of children’s books: picture books, chapter books, middle grade, and young adult.  You will learn the basic skill of writing and publishing books for children as well as how to find a good agent, creating a winning book proposal, selling your manuscript to a reputable publisher, and marketing your book.  

Ying Compestine is the award-winning author of 20 books, including the acclaimed The Chinese Emperor's New Clothes and Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party. Revolution has received over 30 international awards and is being adapted into an animated feature film. Her books are included in school syllabi globally.   

 

Francine Prose - The Vixen (Online Event)

Thursday, July 8, 2021 - 5:00pm

Thursday, July 8, 2021

Live • Online • 5:00pm PT • $40


Purchase a ticket for this event and receive a complimentary copy of The Vixen, delivered right to your door!

 

Critically acclaimed, bestselling author Francine Prose returns with a dazzling new novel set in the glamorous world of 1950s New York publishing, the story of a young man tasked with editing a steamy bodice-ripper based on the recent trial and execution of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg—an assignment that will reveal the true cost of entering that seductive, dangerous new world.

It’s 1953, and Simon Putnam, a recent Harvard graduate newly hired by a distinguished New York publishing firm, has entered a glittering world of three-martini lunches, exclusive literary parties, and old-money aristocrats in exquisitely tailored suits—a far cry from his loving, middle-class Jewish family in Coney Island.

But Simon’s first assignment—editing The Vixen, the Patriot and the Fanatic, a lurid bodice-ripper improbably based on the recent trial and execution of Ethel and Julius Rosenberg, a potboiler intended to shore up the firm’s failing finances—makes him question the cost of admission. Because Simon has a secret that, at the height of the Red Scare and the McCarthy hearings, he cannot reveal: his beloved mother was a childhood friend of Ethel Rosenberg’s. His parents mourn Ethel’s death.

Simon’s dilemma grows thornier when he meets The Vixen’s author, the startlingly beautiful, reckless, seductive Anya Partridge, ensconced in her opium-scented boudoir in a luxury Hudson River mental asylum. As mysteries deepen—as the confluence of sex, money, politics and power spirals out of Simon’s control—he must face what he’s lost by exchanging the loving safety of his middle-class Jewish parents’ Coney Island apartment for the witty, whiskey-soaked orbit of his charismatic boss, the legendary Warren Landry. Gradually Simon realizes that the people around him are not what they seem, that everyone is keeping secrets, that ordinary events may conceal a diabolical plot—and that these crises may steer him toward a brighter future.

At once domestic and political, contemporary and historic, funny and heartbreaking, enlivened by surprising plot turns and passages from Anya’s hilariously bad novel, The Vixen illuminates a period of history with eerily striking similarities to the current moment. Meanwhile it asks timeless questions: How do we balance ambition and conscience? What do social mobility and cultural assimilation require us to sacrifice? How do we develop an authentic self, discover a vocation, and learn to live with the mysteries of love, family, art, life and loss?

Francine Prose is the author of twenty-one works of fiction including, the highly acclaimed Mister Monkey; the New York Times bestseller Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932; A Changed Man, which won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize; and Blue Angel, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her works of nonfiction include the highly praised Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife, and the New York Times bestseller Reading Like a Writer, which has become a classic. The recipient of numerous grants and honors, including a Guggenheim and a Fulbright, a Director’s Fellow at the Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, Prose is a former president of PEN American Center, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at Bard College.

 

 

Online Class: Ying Compestine - How to Edit Your Work Into a Bestselling Book

Saturday, June 19, 2021 - 1:30pm to 4:00pm


How to Write a Children's Book and Get It Published
Sat., June 19, 2021 • 10:00am-12:30pm PT

How to Edit Your Work Into a Bestselling Book
Sat., June 19, 2021 • 1:30-4:00pm PT

Hosted via Zoom • $85 each • $150 for both

REGISTER FOR "EDIT YOUR WORK"

REGISTER FOR "CHILDREN'S BOOKS"  REGISTER FOR BOTH

 

In How to Edit Your Work Into a Bestselling Book, Ying will share with you her processes of editing her own bestselling books. You will learn how to build a story arc, create memorable characters and vivid settings, and make every word count. She will also take you through the process of how to get your book published, and finding a good agent and a publisher.

In How to Write a Children's Book and Get It Published, Ying will introduce you to the different genres of children’s books: picture books, chapter books, middle grade, and young adult.  You will learn the basic skill of writing and publishing books for children as well as how to find a good agent, creating a winning book proposal, selling your manuscript to a reputable publisher, and marketing your book.  

Ying Compestine is the award-winning author of 20 books, including the acclaimed The Chinese Emperor's New Clothes and Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party. Revolution has received over 30 international awards and is being adapted into an animated feature film. Her books are included in school syllabi globally.   

 

Eric Berkowitz with Judy Muller - Dangerous Ideas (Online Event)

Tuesday, May 11, 2021 - 1:00pm


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Book Passage Presents

Tuesday, May 11, 2021 • 1:00pm PT • Live • Online

In conversation with Judy Muller

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A fascinating examination of how restricting speech has continuously shaped our culture, and how censorship is used as a tool to prop up authorities and maintain class and gender disparities.

Through compelling narrative, historian Eric Berkowitz reveals how drastically censorship has shaped our modern society. More than just a history of censorship, Dangerous Ideas illuminates the power of restricting speech; how it has defined states, ideas, and culture; and (despite how each of us would like to believe otherwise) how it is something we all participate in.

This engaging cultural history of censorship and thought suppression throughout the ages takes readers from the first Chinese emperor's wholesale elimination of books, to Henry VIII's decree of death for anyone who "imagined" his demise, and on to the attack on Charlie Hebdo and the volatile politics surrounding censorship of social media.

Highlighting the base impulses driving many famous acts of suppression, Berkowitz demonstrates the fragility of power and how every individual can act as both the suppressor and the suppressed.

Eric Berkowitz is a writer, lawyer, and journalist. For more than 20 years, he practiced intellectual property and business litigation law in Los Angeles. Berkowitz has published widely throughout his career, and his writing has appeared in periodicals such as the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Economist, the Los Angeles Times, and LA Weekly. His previous books include Sex and Punishment and The Boundaries of Desire. He lives in San Francisco. 

Judy Muller is an Emmy, duPont-Columbia, and Peabody Award-winning television correspondent and National Public Radio commentator. Working for ABC News in 1990, Muller covered—among other stories—the 1992 Rodney King trial and ensuing riots, for which she received an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award; the 1994 Northridge earthquake; and the O.J. Simpson criminal and civil trials, for which she received an Emmy Award. In 2011, she received a second duPont-Columbia Award, as well as a Peabody, for her reporting on medical marijuana dispensaries in Southern California. A regular contributor to NPR's Morning Edition, she also wrote a book about her experiences as a journalist titled Now This: Radio, Television and the Real World. Before joining the ABC News team, Muller was a CBS News correspondent who contributed to CBS News Sunday Morning and the CBS Weekend News, as well as anchoring First Line Report and Correspondent's Notebook on CBS News Radio. She was also a summer anchor for The Osgood File. Muller developed her individual reporting style during stints at The Colonial News and WHWH-WPST, both in New Jersey, and KHOW-AM in Colorado. She is currently a faculty member of the USC Anneberg School for Communication and Journalism. Her most recent book is Emus Loose in Egnar: Big Stories from Small Towns.

 

Eric Berkowitz photo by Hillary Goidell; Judy Muller photo by USC

 

Carol Leonnig with Michael Krasny - Zero Fail (Online Event)

Monday, May 24, 2021 - 5:30pm


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Book Passage Presents

Monday, May 24, 2021 • 5:30pm PT • Live • Online

In conversation with Michael Krasny

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR E-NEWSLETTER
This event will be broadcast live and does not require registration to attend. To view, please click the "Watch Here" button at the time of the event, or subscribe to our e-newsletter to receive a ten-minute reminder.
 

The first definitive account of the rise and fall of the Secret Service, from the Kennedy assassination to the alarming mismanagement of the Obama and Trump years, right up to the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6—by the Pulitzer Prize winner and #1 New York Times bestselling co-author of A Very Stable Genius.

Carol Leonnig has been reporting on the Secret Service for The Washington Post for most of the last decade, bringing to light the secrets, scandals, and shortcomings that plague the agency today—from a toxic work culture to dangerously outdated equipment to the deep resentment within the ranks at key agency leaders, who put protecting the agency’s once-hallowed image before fixing its flaws. But the Secret Service wasn’t always so troubled.

The Secret Service was born in 1865, in the wake of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, but its story begins in earnest in 1963, with the death of John F. Kennedy. Shocked into reform by its failure to protect the president on that fateful day in Dallas, this once-sleepy agency was radically transformed into an elite, highly trained unit that would redeem itself several times, most famously in 1981 by thwarting an assassination attempt against Ronald Reagan. But this reputation for courage and excellence would not last forever. By Barack Obama’s presidency, the once-proud Secret Service was running on fumes and beset by mistakes and alarming lapses in judgment: break-ins at the White House, an armed gunman firing into the windows of the residence while confused agents stood by, and a massive prostitution scandal among agents in Cartagena, to name just a few. With Donald Trump’s arrival, a series of promised reforms were cast aside, as a president disdainful of public service instead abused the Secret Service to rack up political and personal gains.

To explore these problems in the ranks, Leonnig interviewed dozens of current and former agents, government officials, and whistleblowers who put their jobs on the line to speak out about a hobbled agency that’s in desperate need of reform. “I will be forever grateful to them for risking their careers,” she writes, “not because they wanted to share tantalizing gossip about presidents and their families, but because they know that the Service is broken and needs fixing. By telling their story, they hope to revive the Service they love.”

Carol Leonnig is a national investigative reporter at The Washington Post, where she has worked since 2000. A three-time Pulitzer Prize winner and co-author of the #1 New York Times bestseller A Very Stable Genius, Leonnig is also an on-air contributor to NBC News and MSNBC. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband and two children.

Michael Krasny is the former host of the award winning KQED Forum, a program discussing news and public affairs, current events, culture, health, business and technology.

 

Carol Leonnig photo by Marvin Joseph; Michael Krasny photo by David Berne

 

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