Thad Carhart - Finding Fontainebleau (San Francisco)

Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - 6:30pm

For a young American boy in the 1950s, Fontainebleau was a sight both strange and majestic, home to a continual series of adventures: a different language to learn, weekend visits to nearby Paris, family road trips to Spain and Italy. Then there was the château itself: a sprawling palace once the residence of kings, its grounds the perfect place to play hide-and-seek. The curiosities of the small town and the time with his family as expats left such an impression on him that thirty years later Thad Carhart returned to France with his wife to raise their two children. Touring Fontainebleau again as an adult, he began to appreciate its influence on French style, taste, art, and architecture. Each trip to Fontainebleau introduces him to entirely new aspects of the château’s history, enriching his memories and leading him to Patrick Ponsot, the head of the château’s restoration, who becomes Carhart’s guide to the hidden Fontainebleau.

What emerges is an intimate chronicle of a time and place few have experienced. Finding Fontainebleau is for those captivated by the French way of life, for armchair travelers, and for anyone who has ever fallen in love with a place they want to visit over and over again.

Thad Carhart grew up in a variety of places, including Washington, D.C.; Fontainebleau, France; Minneapolis; Amherst, Massachusetts; and Tokyo. After graduating from Yale, he worked for the State Department as an interpreter. He has also written The Piano Shop on the Left Bank and Across the Endless River.

Location: 
1 Ferry Building
San Francisco, CA 94111
Finding Fontainebleau: An American Boy in France Cover Image
$27.00
ISBN: 9780525428800
Availability: Special Order
Published: Viking - May 17th, 2016

A beguiling memoir of a childhood in 1950s France from the much-admired New York Times bestselling author of The Piano Shop on the Left Bank

"Like the castle, Carhart's] memoir imaginatively and smoothly integrates multiple influences, styles and whims."--The New York Times