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« Week of June 15, 2014 »
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15
Start: 9:00 am
End: 3:00 pm

 

Join us for the 7th Annual Book Passage Children’s Writers & Illustrators Conference. The Conference will cover all aspects of writing and illustrating for children—from developing ideas to honing skills to finding a publisher. Participants will work closely with other writers and illustrators, as well as with agents, editors, and publishers. The conference is designed to meet the differing needs of those who create for different age groups. Participants will choose an area of emphasis for the morning sessions, such as writing for picture books, early readers, young adult books or illustration, and then work with a teacher in a workshop setting. In the afternoon, participants choose from panels of common interest, such as working with editors, working with agents, marketing and promotion. There will be many opportunities for faculty and participants to talk, laugh, and exchange ideas in classes, lunches, and at evening events.

Questions or concerns? Contact Kathryn Petrocelli at 800-999-7909, ext. 239, or email bpconferences@bookpassage.com.

2014 Faculty
201
4 Schedule
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Private Consultations
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Frequently Asked Questions 

 

16
Start: 7:00 pm

Please note this event has been postponed. For details on our rescheduled date, please email events@bookpassage.com.

Award-winning documentary photographer, Doug Menuez, delivers a stunning visual history of the Silicon Valley technology boom, witnessing key moments in the careers of Steve Jobs and other leading innovators as they created today's digital world.

In the spring of 1985, a technological revolution was underway in Silicon Valley, and Menuez was there in search of a story. At the same time, Steve Jobs was being forced out of his beloved Apple and starting over with a new company, NeXT Computer. His goal was to build a supercomputer with the power to transform education. Menuez had found his story.

Menuez hoped to photograph Jobs as he built this new computer from conception to product launch. In an amazing act of trust, Jobs granted Menuez unprecedented access to him and his team. Once Silicon Valley heard Jobs had granted him complete access, they all did. Over the years, Menuez photographed behind the scenes at Adobe, Apple, Microsoft, Intel, and more than seventy other leading companies (and their innovators).

By 2000, an era was ending, and Steve Jobs was riding a blazing rocket back to glory. The growth of transformational technology during this singular era had led to the creation of more jobs and wealth than any time in human history. And Menuez was there, witness to a global revolution.

In Fearless Genius: The Digital Revolution in Silicon Valley 1985-2000 ($39.99), Menuez brings his experiences to print. He shows, in 100 stunning photographs, the human face of innovation and what it takes to transform the power of ideas into reality.

Doug Menuez's career began in 1981 at The Washington Post, then continued as a freelancer for Time, Newsweek, Life, Fortune, the New York Times Magazine, and many more publications. His many awards include honors from Communication Arts, the Kelly Awards, AOP London, and Photo District News, among others. He has been exhibited in shows in the US and Europe. Stanford University Library acquired his extensive archive of more than 1 million photographs and created the Douglas Menuez Photography Collection at Stanford University Library.

 

 

17
Start: 12:30 pm

In this shattering and iconic American novel, Fourth of July Creek ($26.99), PEN prize-winning writer, Smith Henderson, explores the complexities of freedom, community, grace, suspicion and anarchy, brilliantly depicting our nation's disquieting and violent contradictions.

After trying to help Benjamin Pearl, an undernourished, nearly feral eleven-year-old boy living in the Montana wilderness, social worker Pete Snow comes face to face with the boy's profoundly disturbed father, Jeremiah. With courage and caution, Pete slowly earns a measure of trust from this paranoid survivalist itching for a final conflict that will signal the coming End Times.

But as Pete's own family spins out of control, Pearl's activities spark the full-blown interest of the F.B.I., putting Pete at the center of a massive manhunt from which no one will emerge unscathed.

Smith Henderson was a 2011 Philip Roth Resident in Creative Writing at Bucknell University, a 2011 Pushcart Prize winner and a Fellow at the Michener Center for Writers in Austin, Texas. Born and raised in Montana, he currently works at the prestigious advertising firm, Wieden + Kennedy, where he wrote the Emmy-nominated Super Bowl commercial, “Halftime in America,” featuring Clint Eastwood. His fiction has appeared in American Short Fiction, One Story, New Orleans Review, Makeout Creek, and Witness. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

 

Start: 7:00 pm
The 20th century was a time of great change, particularly in the arts, but seldom explored were the female poets of that time. Robert Hass and Paul Ebenkamp have put together a comprehensive anthology of poetry featuring the poems of Gertrude Stein, Lola Ridge, Amy Lowell, Elsa Von Freytag-Loringhoven, Adelaide Crapsey, Angelina Weld Grimke, Anne Spencer, Mina Loy, Hazel Hall, Hilda Doolittle, Marianne Moore, Djuna Barnes, and Hildegarde Flanner. With an introduction from Hass and Ebenkamp, as well as detailed annotation through out to guide the reader, Modernist Women Poets ($28.00) is a wonderful collection of poems that will bring together the great female writers of the modernist period as well as deconstruct the language and writing that surfaced during that period.

Robert Hass served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997 and as a Chancellor of The Academy of American Poets from 2001 to 2007. He lives in California with his wife, poet Brenda Hillman, and teaches at the University of California, Berkeley.

Paul Ebenkamp previously edited the Counterpoint title The Etiquette of Freedom, a conversation with Jim Harrison and Gary Snyder and Song of Myself, a collection of poems from Walt Whitman. He lives and works in Berkeley, California.
 
Speakers at the event will include: Bob Hass, Carol Snow, giovanni singleton, Gillian Conoley, Denise Lawson, and Brenda Hillman.
  
18
Start: 3:15 pm
End: 5:00 pm

Four Wednesdays • June 18-July 9 • 3:15-5:00 pm • $100

 

 

The ancient myths sought to explain the fears and delights of existence and continue to do so today. We’ll explore the stories of Homer, the Greek dramatists, Ovid, and others as interpreted by Greek vase painters, Roman sculptors, Medieval book illustrators, and Renaissance and Baroque painters and sculptors. What do the images tell us of the concerns of the times in which they were produced? Artists range from Exekias to Salvador Dali, and they will be examined as we unravel the many conquests of Zeus, Cupid and Psyche, Narcissus and Echo, and many others.

Kerrin Meis taught art history at SFSU for ten years and now lectures for the College of Marin and Dominican University and leads study tours in Europe. Her Book Passage classes have been big favorites for years.

Start: 6:00 pm
Featuring a Book Passage Ice Cream Social
 
Bestselling author Susan Jane Gilman's debut novel, The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street ($26.00) is an epic story of a fierce young immigrant's rise to become the greatest ice cream maker in America... and the events that threaten to destroy her.

In 1913, little Malka Treynovsky flees Russia with her family. Bedazzled by tales of gold and movie stardom, she tricks them into buying tickets for America. Yet no sooner do they land on the squalid Lower East Side of Manhattan, than Malka is crippled and abandoned in the street.

Taken in by a tough-loving Italian ices peddler, she manages to survive through cunning and inventiveness. As she learns the secrets of his trade, she begins to shape her own destiny. She falls in love with a gorgeous, illiterate radical named Albert, and they set off across America in an ice cream truck. Slowly, she transforms herself into Lillian Dunkle, "The Ice Cream Queen" -- doyenne of an empire of ice cream franchises and a celebrated television personality.

Lillian's rise to fame and fortune spans seventy years and is inextricably linked to the course of American history itself, from Prohibition to the disco days of Studio 54. Yet Lillian Dunkle is nothing like the whimsical motherly persona she crafts for herself in the media. Conniving, profane, and irreverent, she is a supremely complex woman who prefers a good stiff drink to an ice cream cone. And when her past begins to catch up with her, everything she has spent her life building is at stake.
 
Susan Jane Gilman is the author of Hypocrite in a Pouffy White Dress and Kiss My Tiara. She has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Michigan, and has written commentary for The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, and Ms. magazine, among others. Her fiction and essays have received several literary awards.
 
 
Start: 6:00 pm

Book Passage is thrilled to welcome four YA authors from the Fierce Reads book tour to discuss their new and upcoming books. 

Leigh Bardugo is the author of the New York Times bestsellers Shadow and Bone and Siege and Storm. She was born in Jerusalem, grew up in Los Angeles, graduated from Yale University, and has worked in advertising, journalism, and most recently makeup and special effects. Ruin and Rising ($18.99) is the thrilling final installment in the Grisha Trilogy.

Emmy Laybourne is a novelist, teacher, and former character actress. Before her life as an author, Emmy performed original comedy on Comedy Central, MTV, and VH1; and acted in the movies Superstar, The In-Laws, and Nancy Drew, among others. She reaches new heights of tension and romance in Monument 14: Savage Drift ($17.99), the action-packed conclusion to the Monument 14 trilogy.

Ava Dellaira is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where she was a Truman Capote Fellow. She grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and received her undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago. Love Letters to the Dead ($17.99), her debut novel, begins as an assignment for English class: Write a letter to a dead person. Laurel chooses Kurt Cobain because her sister, May, loved him. And he died young, just like May did. Soon, Laurel has a notebook full of letters, writing about starting high school, navigating new friendships, falling in love for the first time, and learning to live with her splintering family. 

Jennifer Mathieu started writing stories when she was in kindergarten and now teaches English to middle and high schoolers. In her remarkable debut novel, The Truth About Alice ($16.99), four Healy High students tell all they "know" about Alice--and in doing so reveal their own secrets and motivations, painting a raw look at the realities of teen life.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm
Gone Feral ($26.95) is Novella Carpenter’s search for her father. Back-to-the-land homesteader, gifted classical guitarist, Korean War vet, hermit, curmudgeon, George Carpenter has been absent for most of his daughter’s life. But when he officially goes missing— only to be found in a fleabag Arizona motel, escaping the brutal Idaho winter—his daughter is forced to confront the truth: Her time with her dad, now seventy-three years old, is limited, and the moment to restore their relationship is now. Thus begins a journey of discovery that carries Carpenter from her Oakland urban farm to her father’s ramshackle cabin on a quest for connection that reveals who she is and where she came from.

The story starts in San Miguel de Allende in 1969, where Carpenter’s free-spirited parents meet and fall in love. Their whirlwind romance continues through Europe and ends on 180 acres beside Idaho’s Clearwater River. Carpenter and her sister are born into a free, roaming childhood but soon the harsh reality of living on the land—loneliness, backbreaking labor—tears the family apart. Carpenter’s mother packs the girls and heads for the straight life in Washington State while George remains on the ranch, tied to the land and his vision of freedom.

In Gone Feral, Carpenter, now a grown woman contemplating a family of her own, returns to Orofino to answer why her father chose this life of solitude. She quickly finds that George is not living the principled, romantic life she imagined, and the truth is more complicated than anything she might have imagined. As she comes to know the real George, Carpenter looks to her own life and comes to recognize her father’s legacy in their shared love of animals, of nature, and of the written word; their dangerous stubbornness and isolating independence.
 
Novella Carpenter is the author of the bestselling Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer and is the coauthor of The Essential Urban Farmer. She lives and farms in Oakland, California, with her partner, Billy, and daughter, Frances.
 
 
19
Start: 7:00 pm
Denali’s Howl ($27.95) is the white-knuckle account of one of the most deadly climbing disasters of all time.

In 1967, twelve young men attempted to climb Alaska’s Mount McKinley—known to the locals as Denali—one of the most popular and deadly mountaineering destinations in the world. Only five survived.

Journalist Andy Hall, son of the park superintendent at the time, investigates the tragedy. He spent years tracking down survivors, lost documents, and recordings of radio communications. Hall reveals the full story of an expedition facing conditions conclusively established here for the first time: At an elevation of nearly 20,000 feet, these young men endured an “arctic super blizzard,” with howling winds of up to 300 miles an hour and wind chill that freezes flesh solid in minutes. All this without the high-tech gear and equipment climbers use today.

As well as the story of the men caught inside the storm, it is the story of those caught outside it trying to save them—Hall’s father among them. The book gives readers a detailed look at the culture of climbing then and now and raises uncomfortable questions about each player in this tragedy. Was enough done to rescue the climbers, or were their fates sealed when they ascended into the path of this unprecedented storm?
 
Author Andy Hall, the former editor and publisher of Alaska Magazine, grew up in the shadow of Denali, the son of the park superintendent. He well remembers that terrible summer when he was five and met Joe Wilcox. Hall has devoted seven years to tracking down survivors, lost documents, and recordings of radio communications surrounding the tragedy. 
 
20
Start: 10:00 am
End: 12:30 pm

Friday, June 20, 10:00-12:30 pm, $35

 

 

 

Since their acquisitions in the 1950s, Walter and Lee Annenberg have purchased only the finest examples of works from Boudin to Picasso, bequeathing the entire collection to the Metropolitan Museum. Our virtual tour will study in depth a great many of these masterpieces, addressing issues of content, moments of inspiration in the artist’s life, and particular qualities provided by locale and provenance. Our cast includes Degas, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Cezanne, Seurat, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Vuillard, concluding with Picasso’s “At the Lapin Agile”. Join Kerrin Meis in this imaginary visit to 82nd and Fifth!

21
Start: 10:00 am
End: 4:00 pm

Sat. June 21 • 10:00-4:00 pm • $150

 

 

**Please note date change**

Advice so simple it can’t possibly be right: just tell the story. In fact, the vast majority of writing problems—what’s essential and what isn’t, how to balance inner life against action and dialogue, how to create variety and contrast among the characters, how to use setting to enhance the narrative—can be solved by referring to the context of the story.

David Corbett, author of The Art of Character, leads students in a one-day workshop, reviewing 10-page manuscript submissons from each student in detail to reveal how story guides the revision process.

Manuscripts must be submitted by June 16

 

Start: 1:00 pm
In The Red Room ($26.95), John Knox - expert at surveillance and delicate, international dealings - is understandably thrown when David “Sarge” Dulwich, his contact at Rutherford Risk, hands him a photo of a transaction he recently facilitated in the Middle East. More curious to him, he’s shown that photo while in the Red Room, the private security company’s highly secure underground bunker, where eavesdropping is impossible and privacy ensured. Why all the cloak-and-dagger?

Knox is pressured into accepting a job as an art broker in the mysterious Istanbul, a city situated on two continents where East meets West and Islam meets Christianity. It is a melting pot of spies, terrorists, and conflicting interests.

Teamed with smart, quick, and fearless Grace Chu, Knox must navigate a murky operation, the only goal of which is to spend five minutes in the proximity of a man they’ve never met. Why? What can it possibly matter? And why are so many others bound and determined to see it never happens—at any cost? 
 
Ridley Pearson is the New York Times-bestselling author of more than two dozen novels, including The Risk Agent and Choke Point, featuring John Knox and Grace Chu; the Walt Fleming novels; the Lou Boldt crime series; and many books for young readers.
 
Start: 1:00 pm

Why You Were Born is about remembering life as a child, why it was important to forget and how great it is to remember. It's about learning to let go of the burden of darkness in order to be able to feel light again.

Jerry Downs is an artist, photographer and writer who lives 10 miles North of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Rafael, California. His work has appeared throughout the world in books, magazines and museums. He was born the 5th of 11 children, had a horrible time in school and spent most of his life living hand to mouth trying to make a living and make sense of why he was born. Eventually he stopped trying so hard. Everything that has happened in his life has helped him understand that life is a creative act and joy is the only measure of success. He’s happy to be alive and enormously appreciative that anything exists at all.

Start: 4:00 pm

The Culture of Possibility: Art, Artists & The Future ($18.99) and The Wave ($14.99)—two short books published simultaneously—tell a powerful, emergent story of art and public purpose in very different ways. They open a door to understanding for readers of any age, gender, background, or taste.

Culture is the matrix of every humane society, the power-source of the imagination, empathy, creativity, and resilience needed to activate our innate capacity for moral grandeur and social healing. Begin to see culture clearly and everything changes from despair to possibility. We know ourselves and each other through music, images, movement, and stories. Thousands of years ago, art aided our survival as a species. Today, culture is the laboratory in which we nurture compassion and discover how to improvise a livable future. And artists are both the stem cells of the body politic, generating myriad forms of beauty and meaning, and our indicator species for social well-being.

People sense the truth of this, but the guardians of the old order can’t yet see it. They keep ignoring what’s emerging and trying vainly to solve all our dilemmas with numbers. Corporation Nation is killing us: our social institutions and official understanding no longer fit reality. We are like 20th-century people trying to live in the 19th century.

The antidote to this malady is awareness: face the damage, assess our capacities and alents, envisage the possible, then bring our actions in line with the new reality. The Culture of Possibility: Art, Artists & The Future and The Wave point the way. 

Arlene Goldbard is a writer, speaker, consultant and cultural activist whose focus is the intersection of culture, politics and spirituality. Her book New Creative Community: The Art of Cultural Development was published by New Village Press in November 2006. She is also co-author of Community, Culture and Globalization, an international anthology published by the Rockefeller Foundation, Crossroads: Reflections on the Politics of Culture, and author of Clarity, a novel.

 

Start: 7:00 pm
In answer to the question of what happened following her New York Times bestseller Kabul Beauty School, Deborah Rodriquez is back with a new memoir, Margarita Wednesdays: Making a New Life by the Mexican Sea ($26.00).
 
Irreverent, insightful, and blatantly honest, Deborah takes us along on her inspiring journey of self-discovery and renewal after she is forced to flee Afghanistan in 2007. She first lands in California, where she feels like a misfit teetering on the brink of sanity. Where was that fearless redhead who stared danger in the face back in Kabul?

After being advised to commune with glowworms and sit in contemplation for one year, Rodriguez finally packs her life and her cat into her Mini Cooper and moves to a seaside town in Mexico. Despite having no plan, no friends, and no Spanish, a determined Rodriguez soon finds herself swept up in a world where the music never stops and a new life can begin. Her adventures and misadventures among the expats and locals help lead the way to new love, new family, and a new sense of herself.

In the magic of Mexico, she finds the hairdresser within, and builds the life she never knew was possible—a life on her own terms.
 
Deborah Rodriguez is a hairdresser, a motivational speaker, and the author of the bestselling memoir Kabul Beauty School. She spent five years teaching at and later directing the Kabul Beauty School, the first modern beauty academy and training salon in Afghanistan. Rodriguez also owned the Oasis Salon and the Cabul Coffee House. She currently lives in Mazatlan, Mexico, where she owns the Tippy Toes Salon.
 


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