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11
Start: 4:00 pm

Michael Cunningham’s luminous novel begins with a vision. It’s November 2004. Barrett Meeks, having lost love yet again, is walking through Central Park when he is inspired to look up at the sky; there he sees a pale, translucent light that seems to regard him in a distinctly godlike way. Barrett doesn’t believe in visions—or in God—but he can’t deny what he’s seen.

At the same time, in the not-quite-gentrified Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn, Tyler, Barrett’s older brother, a struggling musician, is trying—and failing—to write a wedding song for Beth, his wife-to-be, who is seriously ill. Tyler is determined to write a song that will be not merely a sentimental ballad but an enduring expression of love.

Barrett, haunted by the light, turns unexpectedly to religion. Tyler grows increasingly convinced that only drugs can release his creative powers. Beth tries to face mortality with as much courage as she can summon.

Cunningham follows the Meeks brothers as each travels down a different path in his search for transcendence. In subtle, lucid prose, he demonstrates a profound empathy for his conflicted characters and a singular understanding of what lies at the core of the human soul.

The Snow Queen ($25.00), beautiful and heartbreaking, comic and tragic, proves again that Cunningham is one of the great novelists of his generation.

Michael Cunningham is the author of six novels, including A Home at the End of the World, Flesh and Blood, The Hours (winner of the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Pulitzer Prize), Specimen Days, and By Nightfall, as well as Land’s End: A Walk in Provincetown.

 

12
Start: 9:00 am
End: 11:00 am

Four Mondays: May 12–June 9 • 9:00-11:00 am • $125

 

 

This class is for first-year students who have had some Spanish study.

Graciela Pera was born in Buenos Aires. She is a graduate of the University of Buenos Aires and has been teaching Spanish for over 35 years.

 

Start: 10:00 am
The Little Red Hen gives old MacDonald some pointers on composting - and a legendary farm is born - in EIEIO: How Old MacDonald Got His Farm with a Little Help From a Hen ($16.99), a rhyming, rollicking read-aloud.

Once upon a time, Old MacDonald didn't have a farm. He just had a yard - a yard he didn't want to mow. But under the direction of the wise (and ecologically sensitive) Little Red Hen, Mac learns to look at the environment in a very different way, and whole new worlds start to bloom with the help of some mud, garbage, horse poop, and worms! Judy Sierra's spirited verse, paired with Matthew Myers's exuberant illustrations, yields a fresh take on a children's classic, complete with raised-bed gardens and an organic farmers' market-making this a perfect story for armchair gardeners and devoted locavores of all sizes.
 
Judy Sierra is the author of many books for children, including the best-selling Wild About Books, illustrated by Marc Brown. She is also the author of The Gruesome Guide to World Monsters, illustrated by Henrik Drescher.

Matthew Myers is the illustrator of Bartholomew Biddle and the Very Big Wind by Gary Ross as well as many other books for young readers, including Tyrannosaurus Dad by Liz Rosenberg and Clink by Kelly DiPucchio.
 
Start: 6:00 pm
Carousel: Essays and Such ($14.95) is an enticing collection of essays and elegant rants written by an experienced word dancer, who speaks to her audience with intelligence and wit.  A lost lady in front of an upscale hotel reminds her of stories by Jean Rhys.  Watching how the media covers Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, she does not mince words. Negotiating public transit requires invoking the presence of Quan Yin. Whether sharing a journey to a poetry salon, or experiencing a stage musical, Jeanne Powell draws you in.
 
Left Coast Writers provides literary connections, support, readings, writing tips, literary chat, unabashed networking, and great fun. LCW hosts a variety of activities to launch the books of members and explore publishing alternatives. See bookpassage.com/left-coast-writers
 
Start: 7:00 pm

Fifteen years ago, Krista Bremer would not have been able to imagine her life today: married to a Libyan-born Muslim, raising two children with Arabic names in the American South. Nor could she have imagined the prejudice she would encounter or the profound ways her marriage would change her perception of the world. But on a running trail in North Carolina, she met Ismail. He was passionate and sincere and he loved adventure as much as she did. From acquaintances, to lovers, to a couple facing an unexpected pregnancy, this is the story of two people-- a middle-class American raised in California and a Muslim raised by illiterate parents in an impoverished Libyan fishing village, who made a commitment to each other without forsaking their own identities.

Profoundly moving and often funny, My Accidental Jihad ($24.95) is a meditation on tolerance that explores what it means to open our hearts to another culture and to embrace our own. It is Krista Bremer's unexpected struggle to reach beyond herself, her accidental Jihad.

Krista Bremer is an American author whose award-winning essays have appeared in national and international magazines and news outlets including O: The Oprah Magazine, CNN, MSN, More, The Sun, and The Sunday Times. Her work has been featured on National Public Radio, and she has appeared in the PBS series Arab American Stories. In 2009 she was one of six American writers to receive a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers’ Award, a $25,000 prize to support emerging women writers in the United States. She is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, a North Carolina Arts Fellowship, and a scholarship to the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference.

 

13
Start: 6:00 pm
The America of the near future will look nothing like the America of the recent past.
 
America is in the throes of a demographic overhaul. Huge generation gaps have opened up in our political and social values, our economic well-being, our family structure, our racial and ethnic identity, our gender norms, our religious affiliation, and our technology use. 
 
Today's Millennials--well-educated, tech savvy, underemployed twenty-somethings--are at risk of becoming the first generation in American history to have a lower standard of living than their parents. Meantime, more than 10,000 Baby Boomers are retiring every single day, most of them not as well prepared financially as they'd hoped. This graying of our population has helped polarize our politics, put stresses on our social safety net, and presented our elected leaders with a daunting challenge: How to keep faith with the old without bankrupting the young and starving the future.
 
Every aspect of our demography is being fundamentally transformed. By mid-century, the population of the United States will be majority non-white and our median age will edge above 40--both unprecedented milestones. But other rapidly-aging economic powers like China, Germany, and Japan will have populations that are much older. With our heavy immigration flows, the US is poised to remain relatively young. If we can get our spending priorities and generational equities in order, we can keep our economy second to none. But doing so means we have to rebalance the social compact that binds young and old. In tomorrow's world, yesterday's math will not add up.
 
Drawing on Pew Research Center's extensive archive of public opinion surveys and demographic data, The Next America($26.99) is a rich portrait of where we are as a nation and where we're headed--toward a future marked by the most striking social, racial, and economic shifts the country has seen in a century. 
 
For the past decade, Paul Taylor has served as executive vice president of the Pew Research Center, where he oversees the Social & Demographic Trends project, the Hispanic Trends project, and various center-wide research initiatives. Taylor is the author of See How They Run and co-author of The Old News Versus the New News
 
 
Start: 6:00 pm
End: 8:00 pm

4 Tues., May 13-June 3 • 6:00-8:00pm • $130

 

 

Kate Rider studied Italian at Stanford University, Middlebury College, and in Florence. She earned a master’s degree in Italian Literature at San Francisco State University and completed a course in Italian pedagogy in Genoa. She currently teaches Italian at Dominican University of California.


Start: 7:00 pm
A reimagining of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde from the monster's perspective, Hyde ($24.00) makes a hero of a villain. As a bonus, Stevenson's original novel is included at the back. 

What happens when a villain becomes a hero?

Mr. Hyde is trapped, locked in Dr. Jekyll's surgical cabinet, counting the hours until his inevitable capture. As four days pass, he has the chance, finally, to tell his story-the story of his brief, marvelous life.

Summoned to life by strange potions, Hyde knows not when or how long he will have control of "the body." When dormant, he watches Dr. Jekyll from a remove, conscious of this other, high-class life but without influence. As the experiment continues, their mutual existence is threatened, not only by the uncertainties of untested science, but also by a mysterious stalker. Hyde is being taunted-possibly framed. Girls have gone missing; someone has been killed. Who stands, watching, from the shadows? In the blur of this shared consciousness, can Hyde ever be confident these crimes were not committed by his hand
 
Daniel Levine studied English Literature and Creative Writing at Brown University and received his MFA in Fiction Writing from the University of Florida. He has taught composition and creative writing at high schools and universities, including the University of Florida, Montclair State University, and Metropolitan State College of Denver. Originally from New Jersey, he now lives in Colorado.
 
14
Start: 1:00 pm
A richly imagined and stunningly inventive literary masterpiece of love, art, and betrayal, set in Paris from the late 1920s into the dark years of World War II, that explores the genesis of evil, the unforeseen consequences of love, and the ultimate unreliability of storytelling itself
 
Emerging from the austerity and deprivation of the Great War, Paris in the 1920s shimmers with excitement, dissipation, and freedom. It is a place of intoxicating ambition, passion, art, and discontent, where louche jazz venues like the Chameleon Club draw expats, artists, libertines, and parvenus looking to indulge their true selves. It is at the Chameleon where the striking Lou Villars, an extraordinary athlete and scandalous cross-dressing lesbian, finds refuge among the club’s loyal patrons, including rising Hungarian photographer Gabor Tsenyi, socialite and art patron Baroness Lily de Rossignol; and caustic American writer Lionel Maine.

As the years pass, their fortunes—and the world itself—evolve. Lou falls desperately in love and finds success as a racecar driver. Gabor builds his reputation with startlingly vivid and imaginative photographs, including a haunting portrait of Lou and her lover, which will resonate through all their lives. As the exuberant 20s give way to the Depression of the 30s, Lou experiences another metamorphosis—sparked by tumultuous events—that will warp her earnest desire for love and approval into something far more sinister: collaboration with the Nazis.

Told in a kaleidoscope of voices that circle around the dark star of Lou Villars, Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932 ($26.99) evokes this incandescent city with brio, humor, and intimacy. Exploring a turbulent time defined by terror, bravery, and difficult moral choices, it raises critical questions about truth and memory and the nature of storytelling itself. A brilliant work of fiction and a mesmerizing read, it is Francine Prose’s finest novel yet.
 
Francine Prose is the author of twenty works of fiction. Her novel A Changed Man won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, and Blue Angel was a finalist for the National Book Award. Her most recent works of nonfiction include the highly acclaimed Anne Frank: The Book, The Life, The Afterlife, and the New York Times bestseller Reading Like a Writer. The recipient of numerous grants and honors, including a Guggenheim and a Fulbright, a Director's Fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, Prose is a former president of PEN American Center, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Start: 6:00 pm
When Rayya Elias was seven, her family fled their native Syria to settle in Detroit. Bullied in school and rebelling against her traditional home-life, Rayya turned her sights to fashion and music. She became a hairdresser and started a band that played the club scene in the early 1980s before she moved to New York at age twenty-three to further her musical career. She lived on the Lower East Side at the height of the punk movement and had passionate affairs with both sexes, but her casual drug use turned to addiction and Rayya was often homeless—between her visits to jail. Yet, her passion for life always saved her.

A rough and rollicking journey of courage and persistence against all odds that is told with a keen sense of humor and a lack of self-pity, Harley Loco ($16.00) is an unforgettable story about pursuing—not always by choice—a life of extremes until finally arriving at a place of contentment and peace.
 
Rayya Elias was born in Aleppo, Syria, in 1960 and moved to Detroit in 1967. She is a musician, hairdresser, filmmaker, and also sells real estate to make some extra scratch. She lives in New York City and Little York, New Jersey.
 
 
 
Start: 7:00 pm

From the winner of the 2009 Iowa Short Fiction Prize, Kathryn Ma, comes the extraordinary, unexpected debut tale of three generations of Chinese-American women in a San Francisco family who must confront their past and carve out a future.

The Kong women are in crisis. A disastrous trip to visit her "home" orphanage in China has plunged eighteen-year-old Ari into a self-destructive spiral. Her adoptive mother, Charlie, a lawyer with a great heart, is desperate to keep her daughter safe. Meanwhile, Charlie must endure the prickly scrutiny of her beautiful mother, Gran, and her brilliant sister, Les.

As they cope with Ari's journey of discovery and its aftermath, the Kong women will come face to face with the truths of their lives--four powerful, intertwining stories of accomplishment, tenacity, secrets, loneliness, and love. Beautifully illuminating the bonds of family and blood, The Year She Left Us ($25.99) explores the promise and pain of adoption, the price of assimilation and achievement, the debt we owe to others, and what we owe to ourselves.

Kathryn Ma is the author of the story collection, All That Work and Still No Boys, which won the Iowa Short Fiction Award. The book was also named a San Francisco Chronicle “Notable” Book, and a Los Angeles Times “Discoveries” Book. She received the David Nathan Meyerson Prize for Fiction, and the honor of being named a San Francisco Public Library Laureate. Her stories have appeared in the Antioch Review, Kenyon Review, Northwest Review, Prairie Schooner, Slice, Southwest Review, Threepenny Review, TriQuarterly, and elsewhere. Kathryn was a Fellow at the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and has taught in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at the University of Oregon. In 2011, she was a Distinguished Writer-in-Residence at Saint Mary's College of California. This is her first novel.

 

15
Start: 6:00 pm
Click here and here to view infographics from The Lost Art of Dress
 
As a glance down any street in America quickly reveals, American women have forgotten how to dress. We chase fads, choose inappropriate materials and unattractive cuts, and waste energy tottering in heels when we could be moving gracefully. Quite simply, we lack the fashion know-how we need to dress professionally and flatteringly.
 
As historian and expert dressmaker Linda Przybyszewski reveals in The Lost Art of Dress ($28.99), it wasn't always like this. In the first half of the twentieth century, a remarkable group of women--the so-called Dress Doctors--taught American women how to stretch each yard of fabric and dress well on a budget. Knowledge not money, they insisted, is the key to timeless fashion.
 
Based in Home Economics departments across the country, the Dress Doctors offered advice on radio shows, at women's clubs, and in magazines. Millions of young girls read their books in school and at 4-H clothing clubs. As Przybyszewski shows, the Dress Doctors' concerns weren't purely superficial: they prized practicality, and empowered women to design and make clothing for both the workplace and the home. They championed skirts that would allow women to move about freely and campaigned against impractical and painful shoes. Armed with the Dress Doctors' simple design principles--harmony, proportion, balance, rhythm, emphasis--modern American women from all classes could learn to dress for all occasions in a way that made them confident, engaged members of society.
 
A captivating and beautifully-illustrated look at the world of the Dress Doctors, The Lost Art of Dress introduces a new audience to their timeless rules of fashion and beauty--rules which, with a little help, we can certainly learn again.
 
Linda is an associate professor of history at the University of Notre Dame. She is also a prize-winning dressmaker, has mastered the art of millinery, and has recreated clothing from every decade in the 20th Century. In order to test the Dress Doctors’ prescription for variety, she wore the same dress to work for a month, while only changing the collar and cuffs every day. Only one student figured it out. 
 
Start: 7:00 pm
Writer Nate Piven’s star is rising. After several lean and striving years, he has his pick of both magazine assignments and women: Juliet, the hotshot business reporter; Elisa, his gorgeous ex-girlfriend, now friend; and Hannah, “almost universally regarded as nice and smart, or smart and nice,” who holds her own in conversation with his friends. When one relationship grows more serious, Nate is forced to consider what it is he really wants.

In Nate’s 21st-century literary world, wit and conversation are not at all dead. Is romance? Novelist Adelle Waldman plunges into the psyche of a flawed, sometimes infuriating modern man—one who thinks of himself as beyond superficial judgment, yet constantly struggles with his own status anxiety, who is drawn to women, yet has a habit of letting them down in ways that may just make him an emblem of our times. With tough-minded intelligence and wry good humor The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P. ($25.00) is an absorbing tale of one young man’s search for happiness—and an inside look at how he really thinks about women, sex and love.
 
Adelle Waldman is a graduate of Brown University and Columbia University's journalism school. She worked as a reporter at the New Haven Register and the Cleveland Plain Dealer, and wrote a column for the Wall Street Journal's website. Her articles also have appeared in The New York Times Book Review, The New Republic, Slate, The Wall Street Journal, and other national publications.
 
16
Start: 7:00 pm
"I have a good poker face because I am half dead inside." So begins the hilarious and unexpectedly moving adventures of an amateur player who lucked into a seat at the biggest card game in town-the World Series of Poker.

In 2011 Grantland magazine sent award-winning novelist Colson Whitehead to brave the harrowing, seven-day gauntlet of the World Series of Poker in Las Vegas. It was the assignment of a lifetime, except for one hitch-he'd never played in a casino tournament before.

With just six weeks to train, our humble narrator plunged into the gritty subculture of high-stakes Texas Hold'em. There's poker here, sure, which means joy and heartbreak, grizzled cowboys from the game's golden age, and teenage hotshots weaned on internet gambling. Not to mention the overlooked problem of coordinating Atlantic City bus schedules with your kid's drop-off and pick-up at school.

And then there's Vegas.

In a world full of long shots and short odds, The Noble Hustle ($24.95) is a sure bet, a raucously funny social satire whose main target is the author himself. Whether you've been playing cards your whole life or have never picked up a hand, you're sure to agree that this book contains some of the best writing about beef jerky ever put to paper.
 
Colson Whitehead is the New York Times bestselling author of Zone One, Sag Harbor, The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt, and The Colossus of New York, a collection of essays. A recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award and a MacArthur Fellowship, he lives in New York City.
 
 
 
17
Start: 9:30 am
End: 4:00 pm
Special event for kids! 

Featuring Annie Barrows, Andrea Alban, Gennifer Choldenko, Christopher Cerf & Paige Peterson 

In conjunction with Children's Book Week, Book Passage is proud to take part in the inaugural Indies First Storytime Day, founded by award-winning author Kate DiCamillo along with the American Booksellers Association and the Children's Book Council. Indies First Storytime Day will be celebrated at independent bookstores across the country, with authors and illustrators invited to read from a children's book of their choice.

At Book Passage we have a day of activities scheduled with some of our favorite children's authors stopping by to participate in the event.

At 9:30 am, we welcome Andrea Alban, author of The Happiness Tree and the YA novel Anya's War, for our opening storytelling activity. 

Then, at 10:00 amChristopher Cerf & Paige Peterson will be stopping by to present the new mini-edition of Blackie: The Horse Who Stood Still, a gorgeous picture book about a local equine hero.

The day continues at 11:00 am with Ivy & Bean author Annie Barrows, who will participate in the festivities with additional storytelling.

At 12:00 pm, there will be a Timmy Failure Total Failure Party! We welcome lovers of Stephan Pastis' Timmy Failure series to take their photo with Total the Polar Bear, make their own Timmy Failure scarf, and participate in a number of fun activities and puzzles.  

Finally, at 3:00 pm, we welcome Gennifer Choldenko, author of the bestselling Al Capone Does My Shirts, who will conclude the day with reading stories.

We hope to see you all there!
 
Start: 9:30 am
End: 12:00 pm

Sat. May 17 • 9:30-12:00 • $40

 

 

Would you like to reenter the workforce, but you’re not sure how to jazz up that rusty resume? This workshop is for women ready to re-launch their careers after staying out of the workforce for a while. Whether you want a job while the kids are in school or you are already an empty nester, you’ll need to reassess your skills and experience (both work and volunteer). Learn how to present yourself in a positive and marketable format.

Alison Berka has an MBA in marketing and has successfully built a second career in development and communications.

 

Start: 10:00 am
A special event for kids!
 
Meet Blackie, the stubbornly motionless equine hero of the delightful and touching biography-in-verse, Blackie: The Horse Who Stood Still ($16.95). This (mostly) true tale tells the heart-warming story of a horse who made standing stock-still a lifelong endeavor-while becoming a champion rodeo horse, a tourist favorite at Yosemite Park, a legendary environmental crusader, and the beloved mascot of one of America's most beautiful towns, Tiburon, California.

Magically illustrated by lyrical paintings, Blackie is destined to become a children's classic in the tradition of Munro Leaf's Ferdinand the Bull and Dr. Seuss's The Lorax, The playful, clever, rhyming text will charm adults and children alike as it delivers an important message about appreciating and preserving the natural beauty around us. 

Christopher Cerf is an author, composer-lyricist, record and television producer, editor, and cofounder and president of the educational television production company, Sirius Thinking, Ltd. Since its first season in 1970, Cerf has played a pivotal role in the creation and production of the Sesame Street television program, most notably as a regular contributor of music and lyrics. In the process, he has won two Grammy Awards and three Emmy Awards for songwriting and music production. Currently, Cerf serves as Co-Executive Producer of Between the Lions, the multiple Emmy-award-winning children's literacy series, created by his company for PBS.

Paige Peterson is a noted New York artist who has also appeared on Oprah and Lifetime Television's Our Home, and who has designed and styled segments for ABC's Good Morning America. Her paintings are exhibited regularly in galleries across the country, and in 2003 she was selected for membership in the prestigious Guild Hall Academy of the Arts. While growing up in Belvedere-Tiburon, California, Paige walked down the old railroad tracks to Blackie's pasture and fed him apples, carrots, and sugar cubes until Blackie's death in 1966. She lives and works in New York City.
 
Start: 12:30 pm

In this funny, frank, and tender new memoir, the author of the New York Times bestseller A Homemade Life and the blog Orangette recounts how opening a pizza restaurant sparked the first crisis of her young marriage.

When Molly Wizenberg married Brandon Pettit, he was a trained composer with a handful of offbeat interests: espresso machines, violin construction, boat building, and ice cream making. When Brandon decided to open a pizza restaurant, Molly was supportive—not because she wanted him to do it, but because the idea was so far-fetched that she didn’t think he would. Before she knew it, he’d signed a lease. The restaurant, Delancey, was going to be a reality, and Molly’s assumptions about her married life were about to change.

Together they built Delancey: gutting and renovating the space on a small budget, developing a menu, hiring staff, passing inspections, and opening the doors. Delancey became a success, and Molly tried to convince herself she was happy—until, in the heat and pressure of the restaurant kitchen, she was forced to admit she hadn’t been honest with herself or Brandon.

With evocative photos by Molly and twenty new recipes for the kind of simple, delicious food that chefs eat at home, Delancey: A Man, a Woman, a Restaurant, a Marriage ($25.00), is a moving and honest account of two young people learning to give in and let go in order to grow together.

Molly Wizenberg is the voice behind Orangette, named the best food blog in the world by the London Times. Her first book, A Homemade Life: Stories and Recipes from My Kitchen Table, was a New York Times bestseller, and her work has appeared in Bon Appétit, The Washington Post, The Art of Eating, The Guardian, Saveur.com, and Gourmet.com. She also co-hosts the hit podcast Spilled Milk. She and her husband own and run the restaurants Delancey and Essex in Seattle.

 

Start: 1:00 pm
End: 5:00 pm

Sat., May 17 • 1:00-5:00 pm & Sun., May 18 •1:00-4:00pm • $135 (Sunday ONLY $60)

Class is cancelled - please call (415) 927-0960 for further information

Make your travel experiences memorable by keeping an art journal. On Day 1, you learn how to transform a blank journal into a creative expression of your journeys. Day 2 will be studio time. If you have previously taken the “Art Journal Your Travels” workshop, you can attend this session in lieu of Day 1.

Virginia Simpson-Magruder of Kentucky Girl Designs, is an altered book and jewelry artist. She can be found at her art studio at the Novato Arts Center and at www.kentuckygirldesigns.com.

 

Start: 4:00 pm

Being a parent is hard work! And when your child refuses to do even the little things—like picking up their toys, or getting in the car—its easy to become frustrated. But what if there was a gentle, effective way to improve your kid's behavior without raising your voice? In Is That Me Yelling?: A Parent's Guide to Getting Your Kids to Cooperate Without Losing Your Cool ($16.95), leading authority on parenting, Rona Renner, outlines effective communication strategies that focus on your childs unique temperament. This book will teach you powerful mindfulness techniques based in cognitive behavioral theory and temperament theory to help reduce conflict and foster cooperation, respect, and understanding. You will also learn the real reasons behind your frustration, how your unique temperament can contribute to you losing your temper, and how you can start feeling calm and connecting with your child in a positive way, right away.

As a parent, you are often under a great deal of stress. Between helping your child with their homework, running a household, and working, its only natural to feel overwhelmed at times. But thats why you need real, practical solutions to help you communicate effectively and compassionately with your children in a way that will benefit you both. This book will show you how.

Rona Renner, RN, graduated from Brooklyn College School of Nursing in 1966, and has since been dedicated to solving problems and helping people reduce their suffering. Her extensive experience includes working in medical and psychiatric hospitals in the USA, training women in childbirth preparation in Zaire Africa, helping to start a learning disabilities program in Pune, India, and providing parent education, ADHD and temperament counseling in California. She currently consults and teaches classes for mental health professionals, teachers, and parents throughout the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond.

 

Start: 7:00 pm
The sensory details that infuse our everyday experience-the smell of a favorite dish cooking, the texture of a well-worn coat, hearing a song that reminds you of a person or a time in your life-can be used to add richness and spark to what we write. Whether you are a professional writer (or want to be one) or someone who enjoys just writing for your own personal fulfillment, Writing from the Senses ($14.95) will show you how to tap into an endless source of engaging material, using your senses as prompts. The exercises will stimulate you to develop stories, imagery, and details that will allow readers to see, taste, hear, smell, and feel that they're in the scene.

Laura Deutsch is a writer, editor, and teacher based in Mill Valley, California. She began teaching writing in 1974 at the University of California at Berkeley and has subsequently taught her popular classes and workshops at San Francisco State University, Book Passage bookstore, Tassajara Zen Mountain Center, Green Gulch Farm Zen Center, and in Arezzo, Italy. For the past fifteen years, her classes have focused on personal essay and memoir, writing from the senses, writing as a spiritual practice, and how to get into print. Laura's personal essays, feature stories, and travel pieces have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the San Francisco Chronicle, San Francisco magazine, More magazine, Time Out, Mademoiselle, and the Dallas Morning News. Her personal essays have been anthologized in several collections, including I Should Have Stayed Home; Best Women's Travel Writing 2011; and Leave the Lipstick, Take the Iguana. Her commentary has aired on public radio.
 
 
Start: 7:00 pm

He already owned and managed two ranches and needed a third about as much as he needed a permanent migraine. That’s what cattle rancher Alan Day said every time his friend pestered him about an old ranch in South Dakota. When he finally agreed to visit the ranch, he fell in love with the its lush prairie. But what to do with it’s 35,000 acres?

The opportunity soon dropped in his lap to establish a sanctuary for unadoptable wild horses warehoused by the Bureau of Land Management. After Day successfully lobbied Congress, those acres became Mustang Meadows Ranch, the first government-sponsored wild horse sanctuary established in the United States.

The Horse Lover: A Cowboy's Quest to Save the Wild Mustangs
($24.95) is Day’s personal history of the sanctuary’s vast enterprise, with its surprises and pleasures and its plentiful dangers, frustrations, and heartbreak. Day’s deep connection with the animals in his care is clear from the onset, as is his maverick philosophy of horse-whispering that he used to train fifteen hundred wild horses. This memoir weaves together Day’s recollections of his cowboying adventures astride some of his best horses, all of which taught him indispensable lessons about loyalty, perseverance, and hope.

Alan Day was part of the third generation to grow up on the 200,000-acre Lazy B cattle ranch straddling the high deserts of southern Arizona and New Mexico. The ranching and cowboy lifestyle appealed to him so greatly that after graduating from the University of Arizona, he returned to manage Lazy B for the next 40 years. During his career, he received numerous awards for his dedicated stewardship of the land. Alan and his sister, Sandra Day O’Connor, co-authored the New York Times bestselling memoir, Lazy B, which chronicles the story of the Day family and growing up on a harsh yet beautiful southwestern ranch.

 



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