Events


Select event terms to filter by
« Week of April 13, 2014 »
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
13
Start: 1:00 pm

Renowned photo-journalist Robert Nickelsberg’s photographs help bring into focus the day-to-day consequences of war, poverty, oppression, and political turmoil in Afghanistan. Since the attack on the World Trade Center, Afghanistan has evolved from a country few people thought twice about to a place that evokes our deepest emotions.

Time magazine photographer, Nickelsberg has been publishing his images of this distant yet all too familiar country since 1988, when he accompanied a group of mujahideen across the border from Pakistan. This remarkable volume of photographs is accompanied by insightful texts from experts on Afghanistan and the Taliban. The images themselves are captioned with places, dates, and Nickelsberg’s own extensive commentary. Timely and important, Afghanistan: A Distant War ($60.00), serves as a reminder that Afghanistan and the rest of the world remain inextricably linked, no matter how much we long to distance outrselves from distant realities.

Robert Nickelsberg has had his work published with the New York Times, Newsweek, the Wall Street Journal, the Financial Times, the Guardian, Paris Match, Stern, CNN, and NBC. In addition he has exhibited photographs at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the International Center of Photography and at the New  America Foundation in New York.

 

Start: 2:00 pm
End: 4:00 pm

$5 for members; $10 for non-members 

Set Your Characters Free: The pitfalls and unexpected rewards of turning memoir into fiction.
 
We are told to "write what we know," which is valid enough when drawing on events and locations which can lend authenticity and supply the ever important "telling detail."  But beware taking a real person (a family member, friend or acquaintance) and placing them, as a complete entity, into a story. You know just how they look, and remember exactly what they said and did, but you can never know the whole truth:  how they felt and thought, or why they behaved that way.
 
Mary-Rose Hayes will discuss writing her new novel, What She Had to Do ($14.95); the reasons it took so long (more than ten years) and how that was a blessing in disguise;  why the characters in the book didn't seem real until she stepped out of their lives and allowed them to develop on their own;  and how, by the time she had typed “The End” for the final time, she had surprisingly come to terms with past issues of her own.
 
British-born Mary-Rose Hayes is the author of eight previous novels including the Time/Life best seller Amethyst, and two political thrillers co-authored with Senator Barbara Boxer.

The Marin branch of the California Writers Club celebrates 14 years with Book Passage. Meetings are open to the public. See www.cwcmarinwriters.com for information.

 

Start: 4:00 pm

Frankly Frankl: Life, Love, Luck & Automobiles ($49.95), is a fascinating book, celebrating Andrew Frankl's 50 year career in all matter of automotive- related media.The Hungarian-born journalist, publisher,broadcaster and TV commentator has some wonderful anecdotes. The sweetest chapter is entitled Love Story, which tells the extraordinary romance with his second wife, Suzie. The childhood sweethearts were separated for many years as he was obliged to flee his native Hungary during the Revolution of 1956, but were reunited 32 years later and married in September 1996. Who says there are no fairy tales in motor racing?

Andrew Frankl is a native of Hungary, leaving Hungary in 1956, and ending up in the U.K., where he attended the University of Sheffield. He worked at Ford and has stayed on the automotive/sports track ever since. Frankl was the owner, publisher and writer of Car Magazine (similar to Car & Driver in the U.S.). He launched two magazines on trucks, sold the company and ended up in California. Currently he is Grand Prix editor and feature writer of Forza, a Ferrari magazine published in Novato, CA and European Bureau Chief of the Autochannel, an automotive site established in 1995. His radio work includes co-hosting a car show here in the Bay Area. He also works for Hungarian TV/radio, Grand Prix racing and the Olympics. He currently lives in Marin County and London.

 

Start: 6:30 pm

Left Bank in Larkspur • Single $120; Couple $180 (one book)

Registration for this event is now closed - please call (415) 927-0960 ext. 1 with any questions

James Beard Award-winning author Michael Ruhlman brings food lovers and home chefs his delightful new cookbook Egg. He explains why the egg is a “miracle of natural design” and the key to the craft of cooking. He shows how to make brioche, souffles, homemade pasta, breads, meringues, custards, quiche, cakes, and mayonnaise. Color photographs take readers step by step through the recipes. Ruhlman’s books include The Elements of Cooking, Charcuterie, and The French Laundry Cookbook.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

This event has been cancelled. 

Esther is a Ugandan teenager abducted by the Lord's Resistance Army and forced to witness and commit unspeakable atrocities, who is struggling to survive, to escape, and to find a way to live with what she has seen and done. Jane is an American journalist who has traveled to Africa, hoping to give a voice to children like Esther and to find her center after a series of failed relationships. Using unflinching prose, author, Susan Minot interweaves their stories, giving us razor-sharp portraits of two extraordinary young women confronting displacement, heartbreak, and the struggle to wrest meaning from events that test them both in unimaginable ways.  

With mesmerizing emotional intensity and stunning evocations of Africa's beauty and its horror, Thirty Girls ($26.95) gives us Minot's most brilliant and ambitious novel yet.

Susan Minot's first novel, Monkeys, was published in a dozen countries and received the Prix Femina Étranger in France. She is the author of Rapture, Lust & Other Stories, Folly, and Poems 4 A.M., and wrote the screenplay for Bernardo Bertolucci's Stealing Beauty. Her novel Evening was a worldwide best seller and became a major motion picture. She lives on an island in Maine.

 

14
Start: 6:00 pm

Left Coast Writers® Literary Round-up

Humor. Drama. Love. Mystery. Left Coast Writers will read selections from some of our favorite works in a variety of genres and forms. The Left Coast Writers meet monthly at Book Passage for lively evenings with an amazing roster of guest speakers.

Left Coast Writers provides literary connections, support, readings, writing tips, literary chat, unabashed networking, and great fun. LCW hosts a variety of activities to launch the books of members and explore publishing alternatives. See www.bookpassage.com/left-coast-writers.  

Start: 7:00 pm

Vocally graceful and fearlessly intimate, Steal the North ($27.95), Heather Brittain Bergstrom’s remarkable debut novel, is a strikingly beautiful  portrait of modern identity, faith, family, and love in all of its forms.

Emmy Nolan is a sheltered and introverted sixteen-year-old living in Sacramento with her mom, Kate, when a phone call comes from an aunt she never knew existed. Fifteen years earlier, Kate had abandoned her only sibling, Beth, fleeing their tiny eastern Washington town and the fundamentalist Baptist church that had condemned her as a whore. Beth, who’s pregnant for what she knows is the last time after countless miscarriages, believes her only hope to delivering the baby is Emmy’s participation in a faith healing ceremony.

Emmy reluctantly goes. Despite uncovering her mom’s desperate and painful past, she soon finds she has come home—immediately developing a strong bond with her aunt Beth and feeling destined to the rugged landscape. Then Emmy meets Reuben Tonasket, the Native American boy who lives next door. Though passion-filled and resilient, their love story is eerily mirrored by the generation before them, who fear that their own mistakes are doomed to repeat themselves in Emmy and Reuben.

This is a marvelously imaginative and deeply felt debut, one whose characters live at a nearly intolerable level of vulnerability. Yet, as fragile as they may seem, Bergstrom has imbued them with a tremendous inner strength, proving that home is a spiritual one, that getting over the past is hope for the future, and that the bond between family is truly unbreakable.

Heather Brittain Bergstrom has won fiction awards from the Atlantic Monthly, the Chicago Tribune, Narrative Magazine and others, and a story was named a distinguished and notable story for The Best American Short Stories in 2010. Her short fiction has been published in several literary journals and anthologies. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing. She is from eastern Washington and now resides in northern California.

 

15
Start: 12:00 pm

Ticket: $55 (includes lunch & signed copy of The Other Language)

 

 

"What makes these tales stand out as captivating exemplars of storytelling craft is Ms. Marciano’s sympathetic, but wryly unsentimental knowledge of these people’s inner lives; her ability — not unlike Alice Munro’s — to capture the entire arc of a character’s life in handful of pages; and her precise yet fluent prose (the result, perhaps, of writing in a second language), that immerses us, ineluctably, in the predicaments of her men and women."

—Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times 

The Other Language ($24.95), is the most evocative and immediate work yet from Francesca Marciano, a writer adored by readers for her global sensibility, humor, and narrative flair. Taking us to Venice during film festival season, a sun-drenched Greek village at the height of summer holidays, and a classical dance community in southern India, these stories sparkle with insight, pitch-perfect dialogue, and surprising twists. In all of these remarkable stories, characters take risks, confront fears, and step outside their boundaries into new passions and destinies. Enlivened by Marciano's vivid and clear eye on love and betrayal, politics and travel, and the awakenings of childhood, her newest work is a tour de force that illuminates both the joys and ironies of self-reinvention.

Book Passage hosts literary luncheons with celebrated authors at our Marin store. These events are catered by the outstanding Insalata’s Restaurant of San Anselmo. The price includes lunch and an autographed book.

 

Start: 6:00 pm

The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover's Secret FBI ($29.95) tells the never-before-told full story of the history-changing break-in at the FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania, by a group of unlikely activists—quiet, ordinary, hardworking Americans—that made clear the shocking truth and confirmed what some had long suspected, that J. Edgar Hoover had created and was operating, in violation of the U.S. Constitution, his own shadow Bureau of Investigation.

Betty Medsger's extraordinary book re-creates in resonant detail how this group of unknowing thieves, in their meticulous planning of the burglary, scouted out the low-security FBI building in a small town just west of Philadelphia, taking into consideration every possible factor, and how they planned the break-in for the night of the long-anticipated boxing match between Joe Frazier and Muhammad Ali, knowing that all would be fixated on their televisions and radios.
        
At the heart of the heist were the contents of the FBI files, revealing J. Edgar Hoover’s “secret counterintelligence program” COINTELPRO, set up in 1956 to investigate and disrupt dissident political groups in the United States in order “to enhance the paranoia endemic in these circles,” to make clear to all Americans that an FBI agent was “behind every mailbox,” a plan that would discredit, destabilize, and demoralize those groups. We see how the release of the FBI files set the stage for the sensational release, by Daniel Ellsberg, of the top-secret, seven-thousand-page Pentagon study on U.S. decision-making regarding the Vietnam War, which became known as the Pentagon Papers.

Betty Medsger was born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Medsger is a former chair of the Department of Journalism at San Francisco State University and is the founder of its Center for Integration and Improvement of Journalism. She is the author of Winds of Change, Framed, and Women at Work.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

“War! . . . . / What is it good for? / Absolutely nothing,” says the famous song—but archaeology, history, and biology show that war in fact has been good for something. Surprising as it sounds, war has made humanity safer and richer.

In War! What Is It Good For?: Conflict and the Progress of Civilization from Primates to Robots ($28.00), the renowned historian and archaeologist Ian Morris tells the gruesome, gripping story of fifteen thousand years of war, going beyond the battles and brutality to reveal what war has really done to and for the world. Stone Age people lived in small, feuding societies and stood a one-in-ten or even one-in-five chance of dying violently. In the twentieth century, by contrast—despite two world wars, Hiroshima, and the Holocaust—fewer than one person in a hundred died violently. The explanation: War, and war alone, has created bigger, more complex societies, ruled by governments that have stamped out internal violence. Strangely enough, killing has made the world safer, and the safety it has produced has allowed people to make the world richer too.

War has been history’s greatest paradox, but this searching study of fifteen thousand years of violence suggests that the next half century is going to be the most dangerous of all time. If we can survive it, the age-old dream of ending war may yet come to pass. But, Morris argues, only if we understand what war has been good for can we know where it will take us next.

Ian Morris is the Jean and Rebecca Willard Professor of Classics and Professor in History at Stanford University, and the author of the critically acclaimed Why the West Rules—for Now. He has published ten scholarly books and has directed excavations in Greece and Italy. He lives in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

16
Start: 12:30 pm

A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. His wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Slowly but surely, he is isolating himself from all the people of Alice Island--from Lambiase, the well-intentioned police officer who’s always felt kindly toward Fikry; from Ismay, his sister-in-law ; from Amelia, the lovely and idealistic Knightley Press sales rep who refuses to be deterred by A.J.’s bad attitude. Even the books in his store have stopped holding pleasure for him.

And then a mysterious package appears at the bookstore. It’s a small package, but large in weight. It’s that unexpected arrival that gives A. J. Fikry the opportunity to make his life over, the ability to see everything anew. It doesn’t take long for the locals to notice the change overcoming A.J.; or for that determined sales rep, Amelia, to see her curmudgeonly client in a new light; or for the wisdom of all those books to become again the lifeblood of A.J.’s world; or for everything to twist again into a version of his life that he didn’t see coming. As surprising as it is moving, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry ($25.95) is an unforgettable tale of transformation and second chances, an irresistible affirmation of why we read, and why we love.

Gabrielle Zevin has published six adult and young adult novels, including Elsewhere, an American Library Association Notable Children’s Book, which has been translated in over twenty languages. She is the screenwriter of Conversations with Other Women (starring Helena Bonham Carter and Aaron Eckhart), for which she received an Independent Spirit Award nomination. She has also written for the New York Times Book Review and NPR’s All Things Considered.

 

Start: 6:00 pm

Raiders of the Nile ($26.99) takes place in 88 B.C., where it seems as if all the world is at war. From Rome to Greece and to Egypt itself, most of civilization is on the verge of war. The young Gordianus—a born-and-raised Roman citizen—is living in Alexandria, making ends meet by plying his trade of solving puzzles and finding things out for pay. He whiles away his time with his slave Bethesda, waiting for the world to regain its sanity. But on the day Gordianus turns twenty-two, Bethesda is kidnapped by brigands who mistake her for a rich man’s mistress. If Gordianus is to find and save Bethesda, who has come to mean more to him than even he suspected, he must find the kidnappers before they realize their mistake and cut their losses. Using all the skills he learned from his father, Gordianus must track them down and convince them that he can offer something of enough value in exchange for Bethesda’s release.

As the streets of Alexandria slowly descend into chaos, and the citizenry begin to riot with rumors of an impending invasion by Ptolmey’s brother, Gordianus finds himself in the midst of a very bold and dangerous plot—the raiding and pillaging of the golden sarcophagus of Alexander the Great himself.

Steven Saylor is the author of acclaimed historical mystery novels featuring Gordianus the Finder, including The Triumph of Caesar, as well as the internationally bestselling historical novels Empire and Roma.  He has appeared on the History Channel as an expert on Roman politics and life.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

Joel Sevlin’s biography, Here Comes the Night: The Dark Soul of Bert Berns and the Dirty Business of Rhythm and Blues ($25.00), is the definitive account of the golden age of rhythm and blues in the early 1960s. It chronicles the ultimately tragic story of songwriter/record producer, Bert Berns. Due to a bout with rheumatic fever as a child, Berns was not expected to live to see 21. However, Berns refused to let his  health challenges hold him back and thrived under the auspices of Atlantic Records.

He worked alongside some of the greats of the era: Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller, Jerry Wexler,  Burt Bacharach, and Carole King. In seven years, he went from nobody to top of the pops, producing monumental R&B classics such as “Twist and Shout,” “Hang on Sloopy,” and “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love.”

His fury to succeed led Berns to use his Mafia associations to muscle Atlantic Records out of their partnership and intimidate new talents like Neil Diamond and Van Morrison, whom he had signed to his record label. Berns died at age 38 from a long-expected heart attack.

Joel Selvin is a San Francisco-based music critic and author known for his weekly column in the San Francisco Chronicle which ran from 1972 to 2009. Selvin has written books covering various aspects of pop music—including the New York Times bestseller, Red: My Uncensored Life In Rock with Sammy Hagar—and has interviewed a large number of musical artists. Selvin has published articles in Rolling Stone, the Los Angeles Times, Billboard, Melody Maker and has written liner notes for dozens of recorded albums. He has appeared in documentaries about the music scene and has occasionally taken the stage himself as a rock and roll singer.

 

17
Start: 6:00 pm

The most popular drug in America is a white powder. No, not that powder. This is caffeine in its most essential state. And Caffeinated reveals the little-known truth about this addictive, largely unregulated drug found in coffee, energy drinks, teas, colas, chocolate, and even pain relievers.

We’ll learn why caffeine has such a powerful effect on everything from boosting our mood to improving our athletic performance as well as how—and why—brands such as Coca-Cola have ducked regulatory efforts for decades. We learn the differences in the various ways caffeine is delivered to the body, how it is quietly used to reinforce our buying patterns, and how it can play a role in promoting surprising health problems like obesity and anxiety.

Drawing on the latest research, Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us ($25.95) brings us the inside perspective at the additive that Salt Sugar Fat overlooked.

Murray Carpenter has reported caffeine-related stories for the New York Times, Wired, National Geographic, NPR, and PRI’s The World. He has also written for the Boston Globe, the Christian Science Monitor and other media outlets. He holds a degree in psychology from the University of Colorado and an MS in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana, and has worked as a medical lab assistant in Ohio, a cowboy in Colombia, a farmhand in Virginia, and an oil-exploring “juggie” in Wyoming.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm

Ticket: $30.50 (includes copy of Creativity, Inc.)

 

 

Introduced by Mark Fishkin, Executive Director and Founder of the California Film Institute and the Founder and Director of the Mill Valley Film Festival 

In Conversation with Jim Morris, General Manager/ Executive Vice President of Production at Pixar 

For nearly twenty years, Pixar has dominated the world of animation, producing fourteen consecutive #1 box office hits. But before Pixar was one of the world’s most successful movie studios, it was a small hardware company struggling to stay afloat. Ed Catmull, who co-founded the company in 1986 with Steve Jobs and John Lasseter, led Pixar as it moved toward its goal—to make the first-ever computer animated movie—and grew into the creative, innovative force that it is today.  In Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration ($28.00), Catmull reveals the ideals that have made the studio so widely admired and profitable.

Catmull tells of his childhood fascination with Walt Disney, his experience at the University of Utah when the computer graphics field was in its infancy, and his start in the film business in 1979 when George Lucas hired him to merge moviemaking with technology. Readers learn about the challenges Catmull, Lasseter, and Jobs faced as they brought Pixar’s first film to the screen, and the hard work that came after Toy Story’s success as they built a sustainable creative environment.

This work is a distillation of the core principles Catmull has used to develop Pixar’s singular creative culture. Its lessons will serve anyone who wants to work in an environment that fosters problem solving and creativity, and any leader who wants to enable their people to thrive and collaborate effectively.  Its rare view into how Pixar’s beloved movies are made will appeal to the studio’s millions of fans, and Catmull’s account of Steve Jobs casts a new portrait of the man he calls, “Pixar’s fiercest champion and a close friend.”

Ed Catmull is co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios and president of Walt Disney and Pixar Animation Studios. He has been honored with five Academy Awards, including the Gordon E. Sawyer Award for lifetime achievement in the field of computer graphics. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Utah. He lives in San Francisco with his wife and children.

Jim Morris is General Manager and Executive Vice President of Production at Pixar, where he oversees all of the studio’s productions and operations. He produced Disney Pixar’s Academy Award®-winning feature, WALL-E, for which he was awarded Producer of the Year in Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures from the Producer’s Guild of America, a BAFTA, an AFI Award, a Golden Globe and A VES Award.

Mark Fishkin is the Executive Director and Founder of the California Film Institute and the Founder and Director of the Mill Valley Film Festival. Since founding the Mill Valley Film Festival in 1977, it has garnered a reputation as a favorite among filmmakers and one of the most influential non-competitive festivals in North America. 

 

18
Start: 12:30 pm

Move over bland, wimpy tofu and lackluster salads-- Meatless All Day: Recipes for Inspired Vegetarian Meals ($19.95) redefines meat-free meals as colorful and super-satisfying. Whether you're a committed vegetarian or are trying to cut down on meat, the hearty, creative recipes will inspire you to cook in new ways. Here, you'll discover Beet Wellington, Spaghetti with White Bean Balls, Quinoa-Polenta Cakes with Roasted Red Pepper Sauce and White Bean Puree, Roasted Root Vegetable and Goat Cheese Salad with Lemon-Tahini Vinaigrette, and Baklava Sticky Buns--fare that will make avowed carnivores jealous. One secret behind these dishes: high-impact ingredients (like miso, tomato paste, and mushrooms).

To ensure that readers' dishes come out perfectly, the book opens with key cooking techniques, such as Tips for Perfect Vegetables, The Art of Cooking Eggs, and Tips for a Golden Brown, Crispy Exterior. It then lists 45 ""power ingredients"" that lend vegetarian food a meaty flavor, meaty texture, or both. The heart of the book is 85 ultra-flavorful recipes, with meal suggestions and ideas for making non-vegan fare vegan. Hungry yet? Get ready to stock your pantry and start cooking.

Dina Cheney graduated from Columbia College, Columbia University and the Institute of Culinary Education Career program. She studied art at the Rhode Island School of Design and The Yellow Barn Studio and Gallery. She the author of Tasting Club, Williams-Sonoma; New Flavors for Salads, and Year-Round Slow Cooker: 100 Favorite Recipes for Every Season. For  three years, she has been the "Taste Test" columnist for Everyday with Rachael Ray. She has also written articles or developed recipes for 20 other publications, including Parents, Fine Cooking, Coastal Living, Specialty Food, Cooking Light, and The Huffington Post

 

 

19
Start: 10:00 am
End: 2:00 pm

Sat., Apr. 19 • 10:00-2:00 pm • $60

 

 

 

48-hour advance registration • Limit of six 

Please note the date change 

You’ve written a story and you can’t wait to hear what others think. Or you’re stuck and need help. Bring your story to this on-the-spot workshop, and we’ll critique it. Amy Novesky is a children’s book editor, author, and workshop leader.

Start: 12:30 pm

In 1960, actress and dreamer Lena Spencer opened a small, grassroots coffeehouse, Caffè Lena, in Saratoga Springs, New York. It was a time in America when a coffeehouse could be something more—a focal point for a different sort of people, radical new ideas, and emerging artists. Caffè Lena’s humble stage regularly welcomed musicians such as a young Bob Dylan, singer/activist Bernice Johnson Reagon, and a pre-“American Pie” Don McLean. Quickly, Caffè Lena took its place within the American folk movement that inspired a generation of musicians, artists, and thinkers.
 
The publishing of this remarkable collection of stories and images is the culmination of Jocelyn Arem’s decade-long work as Director of the Caffè Lena History Project, in association with the Library of Congress, and in collaboration with Caffè Lena Inc. Caffè Lena: Inside America’s Legendary Folk Music Coffeehouse ($45.00) brings more than 200 never before seen, evocative images and stories to the public. Early 1960s photographs of Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger, and modern-day images of Rufus Wainwright and Patty Larkin, blend with rare memorabilia and an oral history derived from more than 100 original interviews of artists who have graced Caffè Lena’s stage. These artists include: Ani DiFranco, Utah Phillips, Dave Van Ronk, Spalding Gray, and other luminaries of the folk, blues, jazz, and theater worlds.
 
This exclusive time capsule chronicling Caffè Lena—now the country’s oldest continuously operational folk music coffeehouse—provides an insightful look at the many artists whose poetic lyrics cast a mesmerizing spell over a generation, and who remain beloved today.

Jocelyn Arem is a folklorist, producer, consultant, and musician, who played her first professional gig on Caffè Lena’s legendary stage. Inspired by the Caffè’s history, she began to document the legacy and cultural impact of the venue and its founder. Her writing appears in the American Folklife Center News, The Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal, and Boston Beats magazine, and her research has been featured on NPR, NBC, CBS, ABC, in American Airlines Magazine, and at Grammy week in Los Angeles.

 

Start: 1:00 pm

The Dog Lover's Guide to Travel: Best Destinations, Hotels, Events, and Advice to Please Your Pet-And You ($22.95) answers common questions for pet owners looking to take a vacation with a pet, such as: how can I determine if my dog is ready for a trip, how do I select the right carrier and appropriate travel gear, what do I need to know before booking a flight with my pup? Author, Kelly Carter, shares her knowledge of what to expect at hotels, airports, the beach, and more. The book is divided by region, showcasing 75 pet-friendly cities across North America, from Sanibel Island, FL, to Whistler, BC. In each, Carter offers all the best for pets, from top hotels to perfect parks, to trendy pet shops and doggie bakeries. Special features include walks you can take with your dog, insider tips from local pet owners, and sidebars detailing unique opportunities available only to people with a dog in tow.

Whether you’re looking for a simple off-leash romp in a nearby park, or trying to find a fancy wine-and-wag event, Carter provides the ultimate resource for making the most of travel with your best canine friend. Filling the need for a high-quality, well-researched travel guide for dog owners, this book provides guidance for those planning ahead for summer getaways.

Kelly Carter has spent more than a decade traveling around the world with her beloved longhair Chihuahua, Lucy. She founded TheJetSetPets.com, a resource for people who travel with their pets. A popular speaker at travel conferences, Carter is also the pet travel expert for AOL's pet site PawNation and Elite Traveler, where she’s a Contributing Editor. She has written for numerous publications and websites, including People, USA Today, Departures, Black Enterprise, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Sun-Times, History Channel Magazine, Brides.com, TownandCountryTravelMag.com. With Venus Williams, Carter co-authored the New York Times best-selling book Come to Win: Business Leaders, Artists, Doctors and Other Visionaries on How Sports Can Help You Top Your Profession.

Start: 4:00 pm

In a rousing account of one of the critical turning points in American history, Through the Perilous Fight: Six Weeks That Saved the Nation ($30.00) tells the gripping story of the burning of Washington, and the improbable last stand at Baltimore that helped save the nation and inspired its National Anthem.
 
In the summer of 1814, the United States of America teetered on the brink of disaster. The war it had declared against Great Britain two years earlier appeared headed toward inglorious American defeat. The young nation’s most implacable nemesis, the ruthless British Admiral George Cockburn, launched an invasion of Washington in a daring attempt to decapitate the government and crush the American spirit. The British succeeded spectacularly, burning down most of the city’s landmarks—including the White House and the Capitol—and driving President James Madison from the area. As looters ransacked federal buildings and panic gripped the citizens of Washington, beleaguered American forces were forced to regroup for a last-ditch defense of Baltimore. The outcome of that “perilous fight” would help change the outcome of the war—and with it, the fate of the fledgling American republic.
 
In a fast-paced, character-driven narrative, Steve Vogel tells the story of this titanic struggle from the perspective of both sides. Like an epic novel, this work abounds with heroes, villains, and astounding feats of derring-do.

Steve Vogel is the author of The Pentagon, and a veteran national reporter for The Washington Post. He has written extensively about military affairs and the treatment of veterans from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. His reporting on the war in Afghanistan was part of a package of Washington Post stories selected as a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize. Vogel covered the September 11 terrorist attack on the Pentagon, and the building’s subsequent reconstruction. He covered the war in Iraq and the first Gulf War, as well as U.S. military operations in Rwanda, Somalia, and the Balkans. A graduate of the College of William and Mary, Vogel received a Master’s Degree in International Public Policy from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

 



Shopping cart

View your shopping cart.

Order a Signed Copy Today!

Can't make it to an event? Want a signed copy?

Order a signed book by adding it to your  cart and noting "Signed Copy" in the comments field at checkout. Signed copies available at no extra charge while supplies last.

WE SHIP GLOBALLY!
Questions?  Email orders@bookpassage.com
or call (415) 927-0960