Events


Select event terms to filter by
« Week of March 16, 2014 »
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
16
Start: 3:00 pm
End: 5:00 pm

Marin Photography Club Presents: An Afternoon with Howard Schatz at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel
Non MPC Members $10 donation (proceeds go to MPC)

Actors fascinate us in part because they live out the truths we cannot - or do not - want to live out ourselves. In his 20th book, Caught in the Act: Actors Acting ($65.00), acclaimed photographer Howard Schatz develops upon his well-received monthly feature for Vanity Fair, "In Character." Schatz' mastery of his craft is demonstrated as he himself acts, taking on the role of a director and giving his subjects detailed situations to explore, which are listed with the resulting image. The actors featured here-- including John Malkovich, Pierce Brosnan, Michael Douglas, Colin Firth, Laurence Fishburne, Whoopi Goldberg, Michael C. Hall, Hugh Laurie, Amy Poehler, and Geoffrey Rush, among other illustrious greats-- demonstrate their skill for improvisation while Schatz captures the complexity of their emotional and physical range. This inventive collection is a richly entertaining revelation of the fantasy of transformation. Schatz does not simply create characters from these actors-- he helps to reveal their humanity.

Howard Schatz photographs regularly for Vanity Fair Magazine, Sports Illustrated, ESPN Magazine, New York Times Magazine, and countless others. His photographs are exhibited in museums and photography galleries internationally and are included in innumerable private collections. He has received international acclaim for his work which has been published in twenty monographs.

Howard Schatz and wife/collaborator Berverly Ornstein will be signing and selling their previous photography books, as well as their newest work, Caught in the Act.

 

Start: 4:00 pm

In New York, in the early dawn hours, Isabel Reed is reading. A normal task for one of the most respected and powerful literary agents in the city, but she's reading frantically, turning the pages breathlessly. The manuscript-printed out, hand-delivered and totally anonymous-is full of shocking revelations and disturbing truths. This is what she's been waiting for her entire career: a book that will help her move on from a painful past, a book that could save her beloved industry…a book that will change the world.

In Copenhagen, Hayden Gray, a veteran station chief, wary of the CIA's obsession with the Middle East, has been steadfastly monitoring the dangers that abound in Europe. Even if his bosses aren't paying attention, he's determined to stay vigilant. And when he hears of this book-and the secret that it holds-he will stop at nothing to keep it from seeing the light of day.

As Isabel and Hayden each tries to outwit the other, the nameless author watches from afar. In this tangled web, no one knows who holds all the cards and the stakes couldn't be higher: an empire could crumble, careers could be ruined, secrets could be unearthed, and innocent people could die.

Chris Pavone has once again written a masterful espionage thriller. The Accident ($26.00) is gripping, sophisticated, and impossible to put down.

Chris Pavone, the author of the New York Times bestselling The Expats, was a book editor for nearly two decades. He lives in New York City with his family.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

A Wolf Song: A Story of Forgiveness through Gratitude ($33.95) is a healing story about a multidimensional, dual-life journey of tragedy, gratitude and forgiveness. Its key characters—Hanna and Margaret; their “spirit” wolves, Nano and Nala; family members; and teacher Trudy Goodenough—meet every ten years under Trudy’s guidance and the wolves’ whims. The story begins at childbirth; the girls meet nearing their tenth birthday and discover their wolf spirits under a jump rope. Each chapter contains a verse which reveals the lessons of each chapter. Ordered to meet every ten years by the wolves, Hanna and Margaret meet at twenty in Wales and in New York City at thirty. Nano and Nala are not necessarily balanced. Their karmic rites spill over into the young women’s lives. One of the wolf spirits wreaks havoc at a public event, and a battle between light and darkness ensues.

Lisa Osina was born in New York State and immigrated in 1971 with her family to Israel, where they settled on a kibbutz. Professionally, Lisa’s thirty-five-year career in theatre administration, publicity, and accounting has supported her lifestyle and writing. She is an ordained minister and graduate of Lynn Andrews Center for Sacred Art and Training. Her newest work is a reflection of the journeys and lessons she learned and continues to study. She is also the author of Moving, one in a quartet of autobiographical novels published in 2000 as one of the first e-books published by the Internet Book Company. 

 

17
Start: 6:00 pm

A Special Event for Teens!

Don't Even Think About It ($22.49) is a contemporary teen fiction novel, with romance, secrets, scandals, and ESP, from the author of Gimme a Call, Sarah Mlynowski.

We weren't always like this. We used to be average New York City high school sophomores. Until our homeroom went for flu shots. We were prepared for some side effects. Maybe a headache. Maybe a sore arm. We definitely didn't expect to get telepathic powers. But suddenly we could hear what everyone was thinking. Our friends. Our parents. Our crushes. Now we all know that Tess is in love with her best friend, Teddy. That Mackenzie cheated on Cooper. That, um, Nurse Carmichael used to be a stripper.

Since we've kept our freakish skill a secret, we can sit next to the class brainiac and ace our tests. We can dump our boyfriends right before they dump us. We know what our friends really think of our jeans, our breath, our new bangs. We always know what's coming. Some of us will thrive. Some of us will crack. None of us will ever be the same.
So stop obsessing about your ex. We're always listening.

Sarah Mlynowski is the author of the Magic in Manhattan and Whatever After series, as well as Gimme a Call, Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn't Have), Milkrun, and more. Her books have been translated into twenty-two languages and Bras & Broomsticks was optioned to Hollywood. Sarah was born in Montreal, but lives and writes in New York City.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

In Redeployment ($26.95), a book of short stories, a soldier who has had to shoot dogs because they were eating human corpses must learn what it is like to return to domestic life in suburbia. A Lance Corporal seeks expiation for a killing he didn't commit, in order that his best friend will be unburdened.  A Morturary Affairs Marine tells about his experiences collecting remains—of U.S. and Iraqi soldiers both.  A chaplain sees his understanding of Christianity tested by the actions of a ferocious Colonel. These stories reveal the intricate combination of monotony, bureaucracy, comradeship and violence that make up a soldier's daily life at war, and the isolation, remorse, and despair that can accompany a soldier's homecoming.

This work is  is poised to become a classic in the tradition of war writing.  Across nations and continents, Klay sets in devastating relief the two worlds a soldier inhabits: one of extremes and one of loss.  Written with a hard-eyed realism and stunning emotional depth, this work marks Phil Klay as one of the most talented new voices of his generation.

Phil Klay is a Dartmouth grad and a veteran of the US Marine Corps.  He served in Iraq during the Surge and subsequently received an MFA from Hunter College, where he studied with Colum McCann and Peter Carey, and worked as Richard Ford’s research assistant.  His first published story, “Redeployment”, appeared in Granta’s Summer 2011 issue.  That story led to the sale of his forthcoming collection, which will be published in seven countries.  His writing has also appeared in the New York Times, the New York Daily News, Tin House, and in The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012.

 

18
Start: 6:00 pm
End: 8:00 pm

Four Tuesdays: Mar. 18-Apr. 15 (no class 4/8) • 6:00-8:00 pm • $130

 

 

This class will continue to look at basic Italian grammar and vocabulary

Kate Rider studied Italian at Stanford University, Middlebury College, and in Florence. She earned a Master’s Degree in Italian Literature at San Francisco State University, and completed a course in Italian pedagogy in Genoa. She currently teaches Italian at Dominican University of California.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

Co-Sponsored by Osher Marin JCC

In this magnificently illustrated cultural history-the tie-in to the PBS and BBC series The Story of the Jews, Simon Schama details the story of the Jewish experience, tracing it across three millennia, from their beginnings as an ancient tribal people to the opening of the New World in 1492 to the modern day

The Story of the Jews ($39.99) spans the millennia and the continents-from India to Andalusia and from the bazaars of Cairo to the streets of Oxford. It takes you to unimagined places: to a Jewish kingdom in the mountains of southern Arabia; a Syrian synagogue glowing with radiant wall paintings; the palm groves of the Jewish dead in the Roman catacombs. And its voices ring loud and clear, from the severities and ecstasies of the Bible writers to the love poems of wine bibbers in a garden in Muslim Spain.

Simon Schama is University Professor of Art History and History at Columbia University in New York. His award-winning books include The American Future: A History; National Book Critics Circle award-winner Rough Crossings; The Power of Art; The Embarrassment of Riches: An Interpretation of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age; Citizens: A Chronicle of the French Revolution; Dead Certainties (Unwarranted Speculations); Landscape and Memory; Rembrandt's Eyes; and the History of Britain trilogy. He has written and presented forty television documentary films for the BBC, PBS, and The History Channel, including the Emmy-winning Power of Art.

 

 

19
Start: 6:00 pm

Galadrielle Allman went to her first concert as an infant in diapers, held in her teenage mother’s arms. Playing was her father, Duane Allman (founder of the legendary Allman Brothers Band), who would become one of the most influential musicians of his time. Just a few short years into his remarkable career, he was killed in a motorcycle accident at the age of twenty-four. His daughter was two years old.
 
Galadrielle was raised in the shadow of his loss and his fame. Her mother sought solace in a bohemian life. Friends and family found it too painful to talk about Duane. Galadrielle listened intently to his music, read articles about him, steeped herself in the mythic stories, and yet the spotlight rendered him too simple and too perfect to know. She felt a strange kinship to the fans who longed for him, but she needed to know more. It took her many years to accept that his life and his legacy were hers, and when she did, she began to ask for stories—from family, fellow musicians, friends—and they began to flow.
 
Galadrielle Allman’s memoir, Please Be with Me: A Song for My Father, Duane Allman ($28.00), is at once a rapturous and intimate account of one of the greatest guitar prodigies of all time, the story a band that redefined the American musical landscape, and a tender inquiry of a daughter searching for her father in the memories of others.

Galadrielle Allman is the producer of Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective. She lives in Berkeley, California. This is her first book.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

In conversation with Libby Hellman.

In Cara Black's latest novel, Murder in Pigalle ($26.95), Private Investigator Aimée Leduc has been trying to slow down her hectic lifestyle—she's five months' pregnant and has the baby's well-being to think about now. But then disaster strikes close to home. A serial rapist has been terrorizing Paris's Pigalle neighborhood, following teenage girls home and attacking them in their own houses. It is sad and frightening, but has nothing to do with Aimée—until Zazie, the 13-year-old daughter of the proprietor of Aimée's favorite café, disappears. The police aren't mobilizing quickly enough, and when Zazie's desperate parents approach Aimée for help, she knows she couldn't say no even if she wanted to.

Cara Black is the author of fourteen books in the New York Times bestselling Aimée Leduc series. She lives in San Francisco and visits Paris frequently.

Libby Fischer Hellmann writes Compulsively Readable Thrillers. With ten novels and twenty short stories published, she has also written suspense mysteries, historicals, PI novels, amateur sleuth, police procedurals, and even a cozy mystery. At the core of all her stories, however, is a crime or the possibility of one. Her most recent release is Havana Lost ($16.99), a stand-alone thriller set largely in Cuba.

20
Start: 6:00 pm

Until 2007, a fellowship at the American Academy in Rome—arguably, the most prestigious prize awarded to archaeologists, painters, architects, scholars, and artists—had one huge drawback: the food. The dining room, ideally a place for Fellows to gather and for disciplines to “cross-pollinate,” was catered by an outside company whose dreadful food was to be avoided at all costs. But when AAR President Chatfield-Taylor asked Alice Waters to help, Waters famously responded, “That depends. What do you want, better food—or a revolution?” Fatefully and without hesitation, Chatfield-Taylor replied, “A revolution.” And a revolution was ignited.
 
A year later later, the ideals (local, seasonal, organic, sustainable) were implemented and the kitchen was up and running, with Chez Panisse alums Mona Talbott and Christopher Boswell as chefs. In a matter of days, not only were the Fellows filling the tables at lunch and dinner, they were gathered ‘round the blackboard at 11am, anxiously waiting for the daily menus to be posted. The press wasn’t far behind.

Even if you haven’t landed one of the coveted internships in the kitchen at the American Academy in Rome, you can have a behind-the-scenes tutorial in the way that pastas and sauces are made in its kitchen. The recipes in Pasta: Recipes from the Kitchen of the American Academy in Rome, Rome Sustainable Food Project ($22.00) are arranged in the same order as the interns are taught to make them, from simple to more complex, and are organized the way Italians think about pasta, not only as fresh or dry but by the base of the sauces (oil, tomato, meat, and vegetable). Boswell includes simple techniques, small refinements, and easy variations. Sauces—and even meatballs—are often lighter than their Italian counterparts. Flavors are bright. Ingredients shine. Each dish tells a unique story.
 
Seven years later, Verdure: Vegetable Recipes from the Kitchen of the American Academy in Rome, Rome Sustainable Food Project ($22.00) is the RSFP’s fourth cookbook (following Biscotti, Zuppe, Pasta).  It is perhaps the ideal collaboration among the kitchen and the Academy garden, the artisan producers, and the organic farmers who provide the impeccable raw ingredients used in each dish. Its 92 recipes are arranged seasonally; week by week, it can be used to navigate the harvest of the farmer’s market. Frugality is a consideration: the RSFP kitchen feeds a group, and cost is a consideration (beans, grains, and greens take a starring role). Maximizing flavor is paramount, while every recipe appears simple and is easy to execute, they rise far above the fundamental.

Christopher Boswell is the Executive Chef of the Rome Sustainable Food Project. He has been at the RSFP since the program was established in 2006, when he was chosen by Alice Waters to work with former RSFP Executive Chef Mona Talbott. Boswell started out as a dishwasher and a prep cook in the small gold rush town of Jackson, California. He worked at Stars, Acquarello, and One Market restaurants before moving to Italy for a year to learn authentic Italian rustic cooking. Boswell then joined Chez Panisse, where he received five years of intensive training under Alice Waters and her brigade of distinguished chefs.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm
Susan Katz Miller grew up with a Jewish father and Christian mother, and was raised Jewish. Now in an interfaith marriage herself, she is one of the growing number of Americans who are boldly electing to raise children with both faiths, rather than in one religion or the other (or without religion). In Being Both: Embracing Two Religions in One Interfaith Family ($25.95), Miller draws on original surveys and interviews with parents, students, teachers, and clergy, as well as on her own journey, to chronicle this controversial grassroots movement.

Being Both is at once a rousing declaration of the benefits of celebrating two religions, and a blueprint for interfaith families who are seeking guidance and community support.

Susan Katz Miller is a former Newsweek reporter and former US correspondent for New Scientist. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Christian Science Monitor, Conde Nast Traveler, Moment, and other publications. She blogs on interfaith families for Huffington Post and OnBeingBoth.com. She lives in the Washington, DC, area with her husband and two interfaith teenagers.

 

21
Start: 10:00 am

A special event for kids!

The sequel to the New York Times bestselling novel, House of Secrets--hailed by J. K. Rowling as "a breakneck, jam-packed roller coaster of an adventure"--this second installment by Hollywood director Chris Columbus and bestselling author Ned Vizzini (It's Kind of a Funny Story) is full of even more explosive twists and turns.

Since the siblings' last adventure, life in the Walker household is much improved--the family is rich and the Wind Witch is banished. But no Walker will be safe until she is found, and summoning her to San Francisco brings all the danger that comes with her and puts the Walkers in the crosshairs of a mysterious journey through Denver Kristoff's books. As the Walkers travel from ancient Rome to World War II to Tibet, they'll be tested in ways that cut deeper than before, by Denver Kristoff, the Wind Witch, and each other, in House of Secrets: Battle of the Beasts ($17.99).

Chris Columbus has written, directed, and produced some of the most successful box-office hits in Hollywood history. He first made his name by writing several original scripts produced by Steven Spielberg, including the back-to-back hits Gremlins and The Goonies. As a director, Columbus has been at the helm of such iconic projects as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Home Alone, Stepmom, and Mrs. Doubtfire. As a producer, Columbus was also behind the hit films Night at the Museum and The Help.

Start: 6:00 pm

A Special Event for Kids!

Featuring artist, LeUyen Pham & editor/ author, Kevin Lewis. 

In a country struggling with acceptance, hope can come in many different forms.
 
As a boy, Hector loved playing soccer in his small Johannesburg township. He dreamed of playing on a real pitch with the boys from another part of the city, but apartheid made that impossible. Then, in 1990, Nelson Mandela was released from prison, and apartheid began to crumble. The march toward freedom in South Africa was a slow one, but when the beloved Bafana Bafana national soccer team won the African Cup of Nations, Hector realized that dreams once thought impossible could now come true.
 
The Soccer Fence: A Story of Friendship, Hope, and Apartheid in South Africa
($16.99) is a poignant story of friendship, which artfully depicts a brief but critical moment in South Africa’s history, and the unique role that sports can play in bringing people together.

Phil Bildner is an avid soccer fan. Away from the pitch, Phil was an attorney and taught middle school in the New York City public schools. He is the author of the Texas Bluebonnet Award–winning Shoeless Joe & Black Betsy, and the co-author, with Loren Long, of the New York Times bestselling Sluggers series.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

In 1810, John Jacob Astor sent out two advance parties to settle the wild, unclaimed western coast of North America. More than half of his men died violent deaths. The others survived starvation, madness, and greed to shape the destiny of a continent. At a time when the edge of American settlement barely reached beyond the Appalachian Mountains, two visionaries, President Thomas Jefferson and millionaire John Jacob Astor, foresaw that one day the Pacific would dominate world trade as much as the Atlantic did in their day. Just two years after the Lewis and Clark expedition concluded in 1806, Jefferson and Astor turned their sights westward once again. Thus began one of history's dramatic but largely forgotten turning points in the conquest of the North American continent.

Unfolding from 1810 to 1813, Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire: A Story of Wealth, Ambition, and Survival ($27.99), is a tale of high adventure and incredible hardship, drawing extensively on firsthand accounts of those who made the journey. Though the colony itself would be short-lived, its founders opened provincial American eyes to the remarkable potential of the western coast, discovered the route that became the Oregon Trail, and permanently altered the nation's landscape and global standing.

Peter Stark is the author of The Last Empty Spaces, Last Breath, At the Mercy of the River, and the essay collection Driving to Greenland. A correspondent for Outside, he has written for Smithsonian and The New Yorker, among other publications, and has been nominated for a National Magazine Award. He lives in Montana.

22
Start: 10:00 am
End: 4:00 pm

Sat., Mar. 22 • 10:00-4:00 • $105

 

 

In this one-day workshop, you’ll learn to balance setting, character, and dialogue to create stellar scenes. Some of the exercises have given birth to award-winning work by past participants. Bring your laptop and/or paper and pen and discover how a good writer takes center stage on the page and holds it.

Linda Watanabe McFerrin is the founder of Left Coast Writers®. Her latest novel, Dead Love, was a Bram Stoker Award finalist.

Class Credit: Participants in these classes may receive credit at Dominican University: bookpassage.com/dominican-credit.

 

Start: 1:00 pm

We were made to love and be loved. Loving ourselves and others is in our genetic code. It’s nothing other than the purpose of our lives—but knowing that doesn’t make it easy to do. We may find it a challenge to love ourselves. We may have a hard time letting love in from others. We’re often afraid of getting hurt. It is also sometimes scary for us to share love with those around us—and love that isn't shared leaves us feeling flat and unfulfilled.

In his new work How to Be an Adult in Love: Letting Love in Safely and Showing It Recklessly ($15.95), David Richo provides the tools here for learning how to love in evolved adult ways—beginning with getting past the barriers that keep us from loving ourselves, then showing how we can learn to open to love others. Richo provides wisdom from Buddhism, psychology, and a range of spiritual traditions, along with a wealth of practices both for avoiding the pitfalls that can occur in love relationships and for enhancing the way love shows up in our lives. He then leads us on to love’s inevitable outcome: developing a heart that loves universally and indiscriminately. This transcendent and unconditional love isn’t just for a heroic few, Richo shows, it’s everyone’s magnificent calling.

David Richo, Ph.D., M.F.T., is psychotherapist, writer, and workshop leader, whose work emphasizes the benefits of mindfulness and loving-kindness in personal growth and emotional well-being. He teaches at a variety of places including Esalen and Spirit Rock Buddhist Center. He is the author of numerous books, including The Five Things We Cannot Change.

Start: 1:00 pm
End: 4:00 pm

Sat., Mar. 22 & Sun., Mar. 23 • 1:00-4:00 pm • $100

Class is postponed until further notice - please call (415) 927-0960 for further information

In this class you learn how to give and receive criticism. The class explores terms such as stiff, melodramatic, or cliché, turning a critical eye on classic works to show that even the greats had room for improvement. Participants learn strategies for offering criticism gently and for receiving it with grace. Eli Brown is the author of Cinnamon & Gunpowder.

Start: 4:00 pm

For a millennia, great thinkers have contemplated the meaning and purpose of human existence; but while most assumed that humanity was the end point of creation or the pinnacle of evolution, Ted Chu makes the provocative claim that the human race may in fact be a means rather than an end- that humankind will give rise to evolutionary successors. In the wide-ranging and authoritative work, Human Purpose and Transhuman Potential: A Cosmic Vision for Our Future Evolution ($26.95), Chu reexamines the question of human purpose in light of the extraordinary developments of science and technology. Chu surveys human wisdom from both East and West, traces the evolutionary trajectory that has led to this point, and explores the potentials emerging on the scientific frontier. This book addresses the legitimate fears and concerns of “playing God,” but embraces the possibility of transcending biological forms and becoming or creating entirely new life-forms.

Formerly the chief economist at General Motors, Ted Chu was also chief economist for Abu Dhabi Investment Authority, the Middle East's largest sovereign wealth fund. Born and raised in China, Chu graduated from Fudan University in Shanghai, and earned his PhD in economics at Georgetown University. He is currently professor of economics at New York University at Abu Dhabi, while also conducting independent research on humanity's place in the universe. 

Start: 7:00 pm

Wish You Happy Forever: What China's Orphan's Taught Me About Moving Mountains ($25.99), chronicles Jenny Bowen's personal and professional journey to transform Chinese orphanages--and the lives of the neglected girls who live in them- from a state of quiet despair to one of vibrant promise.

After reading an article about the thousands of baby girls languishing in Chinese orphanages, Bowen and her husband adopted a little girl from China and brought her home to Los Angeles, not out of a need to build a family but rather a commitment to save one child. A year later, as she watched her new daughter play in the grass with her friends, thriving in an environment where she knew she was loved, Bowen was overcome with a desire to help the children that she could not bring home. That very day she created Half the Sky Foundation, an organization conceived to bring love into the life of every orphan in China, and one that has actually managed to fulfill its promise.

Jenny Bowen, a former Los Angeles-based screenwriter and filmmaker, is the director of Half the Sky Foundation, an organization that is dedicated to reconstruct orphanages and increase learning through relationships. Bowen’s commitment to transform the quality of life for abandoned girls in Chinese orphanages has yielded remarkable results: Half the Sky will be training all the nation’s welfare institution workers during the next five years. Bowen received the American Chamber of Commerce’s Women of Influence Entrepreneur of the Year Award in 2007, and the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2008.

 

 



Shopping cart

View your shopping cart.

Order a Signed Copy Today!

Can't make it to an event? Want a signed copy?

Order a signed book by adding it to your  cart and noting "Signed Copy" in the comments field at checkout. Signed copies available at no extra charge while supplies last.

WE SHIP GLOBALLY!
Questions?  Email orders@bookpassage.com
or call (415) 927-0960