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« Week of March 9, 2014 »
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9
Start: 1:00 pm

In Conversation with Daniel Ellsberg.

Bestselling author Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson has delved deep into the unexplored territory of animal emotions, but in his new book he tackles the wildest creature of all – humans. Beasts: What Animals Can Teach Us About the Origins of Good and Evil ($26.00) is an illuminating account of the relationship between humans, animals, and our perception of violence.

A given person might say they fear shark attacks more than his fellow man, but there is a glaring discrepancy with this prevalent misconception: sharks, orcas, big cats, and other fearsome predators are not nearly as aggressive as humans. We are the only species responsible for killing over 200 million of our own members in the last century alone.

Masson has taught us how to explore human emotions through animal behavior – the way dogs love, cats practice independence, and elephants grieve for their lost ones. In his new work, Masson examines the difference between the unchecked aggression and predatory behavior that separates humans from animals, and who the real beasts are.

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson, an ex-psychoanalyst and former director of the Freud Archives, is the author of numerous bestselling books on animal emotions, including Dogs Never Lie About Love and When Elephants Weep. He lives in New Zealand.

Daniel Ellsberg worked on the top secret McNamara study of U.S. Decision-making in Vietnam, which later became known as the Pentagon Papers. He is the author of three books: Papers on the War, Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers, and Risk, Ambiguity and Decision. In December 2006 he was awarded the Right Livelihood Award, known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize,” in Stockholm, Sweden. Since the end of the Vietnam War, Ellsberg has been a lecturer, writer and activist on the dangers of the nuclear era, wrongful U.S. interventions, and the urgent need for patriotic whistleblowing. He is a Senior Fellow of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.  

Start: 4:00 pm

Reyes of Light ($45.00) by Kathleen Goodwin and Richard Blair captures the Point Reyes Lighthouse-both as it exists today and its compelling history. There are contemporary landscape photographs by the authors as well as images dating from the nineteenth century. Included is the U.S. Life-Saving Service, which patrolled Point Reyes beaches, undertaking dangerous rescues in human-powered lifeboats before the modern Coast Guard was born. The people of the era are revealed through their own accounts, journals, newspapers of the time, and even the gravestones of the life-savers. Perhaps the most inspiring sight visitors to the Lighthouse observe are whales, who pass by on their migrations along the Pacific coast. Photographs and essays illuminate their remarkable lives. This is an essential book for both lighthouse buffs and Point Reyes enthusiasts, by two park afficionados who have spent decades in the national parks.

The Point Reyes Lighthouse is a historic treasure because its 1867 optics and clockwork are still relatively intact. People can stand on its windy perch and imagine what the world was like to the old salts who relied on its flashing light.
The line between fact and the fantasy  is blurred at Point Reyes. History, biology, and mythology converge here in this compelling book, Point Reyes Lighthouse ($19.95) by local artist/authors Blair and Goodwin.

Since 1999 Kathleen Goodwin and Richard Blair have been creating artisan books in their Inverness studio, on a high ridge-top overlooking the Pacific. After spending twenty five years preparing for this work, they are dedicated to making the highest quality fine art books. Richard has been a photographer since 1968, and has spent many years mastering the art of making lithographic plates. Kathleen was a journalist  in South Africa in the 1970‘s. She is also an award winning photographer, and a serious landscape painter.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm

Illustrated with whimsical, full-color cartoons on every page, The Bumpy Road to Collaboration: How to Break Free from your Ego's Hot Buttons ($30.00) describes how our egos’ hot buttons get in the way of authentic and effective relationships – and how we can break free.

Culture Change Partner, Senior Executive Coach, and 
Facilitator at Learning as Leadership, Carole Levy has been with LaL for over 22 years, drawing funny cartoons in her spare time that occasionally surface in her popular blog posts. Many concepts and ideas in this work come from LaL’s methodology, which Levy deftly infuses with her own humorous twist and original illustrations.

 

10
Start: 9:00 am
End: 11:00 am

Eight Mondays: Mar. 10-May 5 (no class Apr. 21) • 9:00-11:00 am • $250

 

 

 

For first-year students who have had some Spanish study. Graciela Pera was born in Buenos Aires. She is a graduate of the University of Buenos Aires and has been teaching Spanish for 35 years.

Please note date change  

Start: 10:00 am
End: 12:00 pm

Eight Mondays: Mar. 10-Apr. 28 • 10:00-12:00 pm • $250

 

 

Lisez à la maison un livre, des textes d’actualité puis discutez en classe et cultivez votre français en échangeant des idées. Révision de grammaire selon vos besoins. Josette Charbit Schwartz has taught French at the Lycée Français, The Branson School, and French American International in San Francisco. She has a degree in bilingual education. Josette creates a comfortable atmosphere and utilizes songs and poems in her lessons.

Start: 7:00 pm
The enchanted place is an ancient stone prison, viewed through the eyes of a death row inmate who finds escape in his books and in re-imagining life around him, weaving a fantastical story of the people he observes and the world he inhabits. Fearful and reclusive, he senses what others cannot. Though bars confine him every minute of every day, he marries magical visions of golden horses running beneath the prison, heat flowing like molten metal from their backs, with the devastating violence of prison life.

Two outsiders venture here: a fallen priest, and the Lady, an investigator who searches for buried information from prisoners' pasts that can save those soon-to-be-executed. Digging into the background of a killer named York, she uncovers wrenching truths that challenge familiar notions of victim and criminal, innocence and guilt, honor and corruption-ultimately revealing shocking secrets of her own.

Beautiful and transcendent, The Enchanted ($25.99) reminds us of how our humanity connects us all, and how beauty and love exist even amidst the most nightmarish reality.

Rene Denfeld is an internationally bestselling author, journalist, Mitigation Specialist, and fact Investigator in death penalty cases. She has written for the New York Times Magazine, the Oregonian, and the Philadelphia Inquirer, and is a published author of four books including the international bestseller The New Victorians: A Young Woman's Challenge to the Old Feminist Order; Kill The Body, The Head Will Fall; and All God's Children: Inside the Dark and Violent World of Street Families.

 

 

11
Start: 10:00 am
End: 12:00 pm

Eight Tuesdays: Mar. 11-May 6 (no class Apr. 22) • 10:00-12:00 pm • $250

 

 

 

Continuation of grammar and language immersion. Graciela Pera was born in Buenos Aires. She is a graduate of the University of Buenos Aires and has been teaching Spanish for 35 years.

Please note date change 

Start: 6:00 pm

Chief resident Steve Mitchell is the quintessential surgeon: ambitious, intelligent, confident.  Charged with molding a group of medical trainees into doctors, and in line for a coveted job, Steve’s future is bright. But then a patient mysteriously dies, and it quickly becomes clear that a killer is on the loose in his hospital. A killer set on playing a deadly game with Steve. A killer holding information that could ruin his career and marriage. Now, alone and under a cloud of suspicion, Steve must discover a way to outsmart his opponent and save the killer's next victim before the cycle repeats itself again and again…

A chilling and compelling thriller that also takes you into the hospital and details the politics and hierarchy among doctors, as well as the life and death decisions that are made by flawed human beings, Doing Harm ($25.99) by Kelly Parson marks the gripping debut of a major fiction career.

Kelly Parsons is a board-certified urologist with degrees from Stanford University, University of Pennsylvania, and Johns Hopkins. He is on the faculty at the University of California San Diego. This is his first novel.

Start: 6:30 pm
Mill Valley Community Center • $69

An unheralded grandmothers' movement is changing the world. Insurgent grandmothers are using their power to fight for a better future for grandchildren everywhere. And they are succeeding. Grandmother Power: A Global Phenomenon ($49.95), profiles activist grandmothers in fifteen countries on five continents who tell their compelling stories in their own words.

Grandmothers in Canada, Swaziland, and South Africa collaborate to care for AIDS orphans. Grandmothers in Senegal convince communities to abandon female genital mutilation. Grandmothers in India become solar engineers and bring light to their villages while those in Peru, Thailand, and Laos sustain weaving traditions. Grandmothers in Argentina teach children to love books and reading. Other Argentine grandmothers continue their 40-year search for grandchildren who were kidnapped during the nation's military dictatorship. Irish grandmothers teach children to sow seeds and cook with fresh, local ingredients. Filipino grandmothers demand justice for having been forced into sex slavery during World War II. Guatemalan grandmothers operate a hotline and teach parenting. In the Middle East, Israeli grandmothers monitor checkpoints to prevent abuse and the UAE's most popular television show stars four animated grandmothers who are surprised by contemporary life. Indigenous grandmothers from thirteen countries conduct healing rituals to bring peace to the world.

Author, Paola Gianturco's full-color images and her heroines' amazing tales make this work an inspiration for everyone, and it cements the power of grandmothers worldwide.

Paola Gianturco, a grandmother herself, has documented women’s lives in 55 countries. Her work has been exhibited at UNESCO’s Paris headquarters; United Nations’ New York headquarters; Chicago’s Field Museum; San Francisco’s International Museum of Women; and many other venues. Her previous works include: Women Who Light the Dark (2007), ¡Viva Colores! A Salute to the Indomitable People of Guatemala (2006), Celebrating Women (2004), and In Her Hands, Craftswomen Changing the World (2004).

Inspired by the fabulous women among us in the Bay Area, Speak to Me was created to stimulate thought and discussion, facilitate the swapping of stories and experiences, and enjoy the sense of community we share in this great place we call home. For more information, visit http://speaktomeevents.com/.

Start: 7:00 pm

One of the Middle East’s most celebrated voices, Rabih Alameddine, brings us an enchanting story of a book-loving, obsessive, seventy-two-year-old “unnecessary” woman.

Aaliya Saleh lives alone in her Beirut apartment, surrounded by stockpiles of books. Godless, fatherless, childless, and divorced, Aaliya is her family’s “unnecessary appendage.” Every year, she translates a new favorite book into Arabic, then stows it away. The thirty-seven books that Aaliya has translated over her lifetime have never been read—by anyone.

In this breathtaking portrait of a reclusive woman’s late-life crisis, readers follow Aaliya’s digressive mind as it ricochets across visions of past and present Beirut. Colorful musings on literature, philosophy, and art are invaded by memories of the Lebanese Civil War and Aaliya’s own volatile past. As she tries to overcome her aging body and spontaneous emotional upwellings, Aaliya is faced with an unthinkable disaster that threatens to shatter the little life she has left.

A love letter to literature and its power to define who we are, the prodigiously gifted Alameddine has given us a nuanced rendering of one woman's life in the Middle East with An Unnecessary Woman ($25.00).

Rabih Alameddine is the author of the novels Koolaids; I, the Divine; The Hakawati; and the story collection, The Perv. He divides his time between San Francisco and Beirut.

 

12
Start: 9:00 am
End: 11:00 am

Eight Wednesdays: Mar. 12-May 7 (no class Apr. 23) • 9:00-11:00 am • $250

 

 

 

A basic introduction for students who have never studied Spanish. Graciela Pera was born in Buenos Aires. She is a graduate of the University of Buenos Aires and has been teaching Spanish for 35 years.

Start: 10:00 am
End: 12:00 pm

Eight Wednesdays: Mar. 12-Apr. 30 • 10:00-12:00 pm • $250

 

 

Further study of tenses and grammatical concepts through simple dialogues, as well as reviewing regular and irregular verbs. Josette Charbit Schwartz has taught French at the Lycée Français, The Branson School, and French American International in San Francisco. She has a degree in bilingual education. Josette creates a comfortable atmosphere and utilizes songs and poems in her lessons.

Start: 6:00 pm

The King's Ransom ($28.95) is the long-anticipated sequel to the national bestseller Lionheart. It is a vivid and heart-wrenching story of the last event-filled years in the life of Richard, Coeur de Lion. Taken captive by the Holy Roman Emperor while en route home—in violation of the papal decree protecting all crusaders—he was to spend fifteen months imprisoned, much of it in the notorious fortress at Trefils, while Eleanor of Aquitaine moved heaven and earth to raise the exorbitant ransom. For the five years remaining to him, betrayals, intrigues, wars, and illness were ever present, but the courage, compassion, and intelligence of this warrior king was to become the stuff of legend.

Sharon Kay Penman is the author of eight previous historical novels and four mysteries. Among writers who admire her work are Margaret George, Steve Berry, George R. R. Martin, and Bernard Cornwell. Her readers are passionately committed. A lawyer by training, by her mid-thirties she was a full-time novelist. She lives in Mays Landing, New Jersey.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

In conversation with Tom Barbash

In isolated British Columbia, girls, mostly native, are vanishing from the sides of a notorious highway. Leo Kreutzer and his four friends are barely touched by these disappearances—until a series of mysterious and troublesome outsiders come to town. Then it seems as if the devil himself has appeared among them.

In this intoxicatingly lush debut novel, Adrianne Harun weaves together folklore, mythology, and elements of magical realism to create a compelling and unsettling portrait of life in a dead-end town. A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain ($16.00) is atmospheric and evocative of place and a group of people, much in the way that Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones conjures the South, or Charles Bock’s Beautiful Children provides a glimpse of the Las Vegas underworld: kids left to fend for themselves in a broken world—rendered with grit and poetry in equal measure.


Adrianne Harun teaches at the Rainier Writing Workshops, an MFA program at Pacific Lutheran University, and is the author of the acclaimed short story collection The King of Limbo. She lives in Port Townsend, Washington.
 
Tom Barbash is the author of the award-winning novel The Last Good Chance and the non-fiction book On Top of the World: Cantor Fitzgerald, Howard Lutnick, and 9/11: A Story of Loss and Renewal, which was a New York Times bestseller. His stories and articles have been published in Tin House, McSweeney's, Virginia Quarterly Review, and other publications, and have been performed on National Public Radio's Selected Shorts series. He currently teaches in the MFA program at California College of the Arts. 
 
 
13
Start: 11:15 am
End: 1:15 pm

Eight Thursdays: Mar. 13-May 1 • 11:15-1:15 pm • $250

 

 

 

Improve your French with current events, varied texts, and dialogues. The class goes further with grammar and verb tenses. Josette Charbit Schwartz has taught French at the Lycée Français, The Branson School, and French American International in San Francisco. She has a degree in bilingual education. Josette creates a comfortable atmosphere and utilizes songs and poems in her lessons.

Start: 7:00 pm

A few months after the outbreak of the War of 1812, Captain David Porter set out in the USS Essex on an epic, seventeen-month cruise to the South Seas. Porter was pursuing fame and riches, and by most accounts his odyssey was a stunning success: it brought glory to the fledgling American navy, cemented Porter's reputation as a daring and talented commander, and has long been celebrated as one of the greatest maritime adventures in U.S. history. Less well known, however, is the terrible price that the crew of the Essex paid for their captain's outsized ambitions. In The Shining Sea: David Porter and the Epic Voyage of the U.S.S. Essex During the War of 1812 ($29.99), award-winning historian George C. Daughan tells the full story of Porter's thrilling, action-packed voyage, revealing the heights of Porter's hubris and the true depths of his failure on this fateful cruise. 

A swashbuckling tale of risk and ruin on the high seas, this new work brings to life the monomaniacal quest of one of the most misunderstood commanders of the War of 1812. Porter's singular voyage, Daughan shows, stands as a cautionary tale for any leader who would put personal glory and ambition ahead of cause and countrymen.

After receiving a PhD in American History and Government from Harvard University, George Daughan spent three years in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. He taught at the Air Force Academy, where he was director of the MA program in International Affairs. Upon returning to civilian life, he taught at the University of Colorado, the University of NH, Wesleyan University, Connecticut College, and Harvard University. His other works include, If By Sea: The Forging of the American Navy from the Revolution to the War of 1812, winner of the 2008 Samuel Eliot Morison Award; and 1812: The Navy's War, recipient of the 2012 gold medal in history from the Independent Publisher's Association, and the 2012 George Pendleton Prize.

 

14
Start: 12:00 pm

Ticket: $55 (includes lunch & signed book)

 

Please call (415) 927-0960 x1 to register 

 

Let’s face it: families not only enrich our lives every day, they drive us completely around the bend. In You Can Date Boys When You’re Forty: Dave Barry on Parenting and Other Topics He Knows Very Little About, Dave Barry tackles everything from bat mitzvah parties to funeral instructions with his trademark wit and wisdom.

Book Passage hosts literary luncheons with celebrated authors at our Marin store. These events are catered by the outstanding Insalata’s Restaurant of San Anselmo. The price includes lunch and an autographed book.

Start: 7:00 pm

Shahan Mufti’s family history, which he can trace back fourteen hundred years to the inner circle of the prophet Muhammad, offers an enlightened perspective on the mystifying history of Pakistan. Mufti uses the stories of his ancestors, many of whom served as judges and jurists in Muslim sharia courts of South Asia, to reveal the deepest roots—real and imagined—of Islamic civilization in Pakistan.
 
More than a personal history, The Faithful Scribe: A Story of Islam, Pakistan, Family & War ($26.95) captures the larger story of the world’s first Islamic democracy, and explains how the state that once promised to bridge Islam and the West is now threatening to crumble under historical and political pressure, and why Pakistan’s destiny matters to us all.

Shahan Mufti is a journalist who has contributed pieces on Pakistan and the political evolution of Islam to Harper’s, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times Magazine, Boston Sunday Globe, The Nation, Bloomberg Businessweek, Columbia Journalism Review, and many others. He teaches journalism at the University of Richmond, and splits his time between the United States and Pakistan.

 

15
Start: 10:00 am
End: 2:00 pm

Sat., March 15 • 10:00-2:00pm • $60

 

 

48-hour advance registration • Limit of six

You’ve written a brilliant story and can’t wait to hear what others think. You’re stuck and need a critique. What to do? Bring your manuscript, or even just an idea, to this on-thespot workshop, and we’ll critique it. Amy Novesky is a children’s book editor, author, and experienced workshop leader.

 

 

Start: 1:00 pm

Boy, Snow, Bird ($27.95) by Helen Oyeyemi begins in the winter of 1953. Boy Novak arrives by chance in a small town in Massachusetts, looking, she believes, for beauty—the opposite of the life she’s left behind in New York. She marries a local widower and becomes stepmother to his winsome daughter, Snow Whitman. A wicked stepmother is a creature Boy never imagined she’d become, but elements of the familiar tale of aesthetic obsession begin to play themselves out when the birth of Boy’s daughter, Bird, who is dark-skinned, exposes the Whitmans as light-skinned African Americans passing for white. Among them, Boy, Snow, and Bird confront the tyranny of the mirror to ask how much power surfaces really hold.

Dazzlingly inventive and powerfully moving, this new work is an astonishing and enchanting novel. With breathtaking feats of imagination, Helen Oyeyemi confirms her place as one of the most original and dynamic literary voices of our time.

Helen Oyeyemi is the author of five novels, most recently White Is for Witching, which won a 2010 Somerset Maugham Award, and Mr. Fox, which won a 2012 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. In 2013, she was named one of Granta’s Best Young British Novelists.

 

Start: 1:00 pm
End: 4:00 pm

Sat., Mar. 15 • 1:00-4:00 pm • $60

 

 

Cynthia Pepper’s short films have won Emmy Awards and are distributed worldwide. She has worked on over 90 films with budgets of every size. This class reviews all the elements of translating a short personal story into a film. Topics include creating a simple treatment or script, drawing shooting boards, casting, location scouting, simple directing techniques, producing, editing, and scoring a short film. Students are encouraged to send a three-sentence synopsis prior to the class (instructions available upon registration). Advance registration required.

Start: 4:00 pm

This event will feature one of the authors, Jasmin Darznik, and the editors, Anita Amirrezvani and Persis Karim. To celebrate the upcoming Persian New Year, there will be an array of Persian tea and cookies to enjoy!

Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers ($24.95) is a groundbreaking anthology that brings together twenty-seven authors from a wide range of experiences that offer new perspectives on the Iranian American story. The authors represent the maturing voice of Iranian American fiction from the vantage point of those who were born and raised in Iran, as well as those writers who reflect a more distant, but still important, connection to their Iranian heritage. Altogether, these narratives capture the diversity of the Iranian diaspora and complicate the often-narrow view of Iranian culture represented in the media. The stories and novel excerpts explore the deeply human experiences of one of the newest immigrant groups to the United States in its attempts to adjust and assimilate in the face of major historical upheavals such as the 1979 Iranian revolution, the hostage crisis, and the attacks of September 11, 2001. The stories set in Iran testify to the resilience, dignity, and humor of a people rich in history and culture.

Jasmin Darznik was born in Tehran, Iran. She received her PhD in English from Princeton University. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and other publications.

Anita Amirrezvani is the author of the novels The Blood of Flowers and Equal of the Sun.

Persis Karim is a poet and editor of Let Me Tell You Where I’ve Been: New Writing by Women of the Iranian Diaspora and coeditor of A World Between: Poems, Short Stories and Essays by Iranian-Americans.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

Why is it always hard to fall asleep the night before an important meeting? Or be charming and relaxed on a first date? What is it about a politician who seems wooden or a comedian whose jokes fall flat or an athlete who chokes? In all of these cases, striving seems to backfire.
 
In Trying Not To Try: The Art and Science of Spontaneity ($26.00), Edward Slingerland explains why we find spontaneity so elusive, and shows how early Chinese thought points the way to happier, more authentic lives. We’ve long been told that the way to achieve our goals is through careful reasoning and conscious effort. But recent research suggests that many aspects of a satisfying life, like happiness and spontaneity, are best pursued indirectly. The early Chinese philosophers knew this, and they wrote extensively about an effortless way of being in the world, which they called wu-wei (ooo-way). They believed it was the source of all success in life, and they developed various strategies for getting it and hanging on to it.
 
With clarity and wit, Slingerland introduces us to these thinkers and the marvelous characters in their texts. He explains why wu-wei is more powerful than flow, and tells us what it all means for getting a date. He also shows how new research reveals what’s happening in the brain when we’re in a state of wu-wei—why it makes us happy and effective and trustworthy, and how it might have even made civilization possible.

Edward Slingerland is Professor of Asian Studies and Canada Research Chair in Chinese Thought and Embodied Cognition at the University of British Columbia. Educated at Princeton, Stanford, and the University of California, Berkeley, he is an internationally renowned expert in Chinese thought, comparative religion, and cognitive science. In addition to over twenty academic journal articles in a range of fields, he has written several scholarly books, including What Science Offers the Humanities and a translation of the Analects of Confucius

 

Start: 7:00 pm

As the creator of Forrest Yoga, Ana T. Forrest has been transforming people's lives throughout the world for more than thirty-five years. Her unique blend of physical practice, Eastern wisdom, and profound Native American ceremony takes her teachings literally off the mat and into daily life--to heal everything from addictive behaviors and eating disorders to chronic pain and injury. In Fierce Medicine: Breakthrough Practices to Heal the Body and Ignite the Spirit ($16.00) Forrest tells her own story of healing from the scars of abuse and physical handicaps, and reveals the proven practices that enabled her to move beyond her past into a life committed to helping others reconnect with their bodies, cultivate balance, and start living in harmony with their Spirits.

In her unique, powerful, and inviting voice, Ana Forrest reveals how to: stalk fear and break free from it, be attentive to your body, speak and act from a place of honesty and compassion, cultivate an open heart that is open and able to embrace change, and harness the courage to live in alignment with your Spirit.

Whether you've never done yoga or are a seasoned practitioner, Forrest's practices, stories, and exercises will help you uncover your own warrior's heart. With this wise woman as your trusted guide, you too can become centered, strong, and more alive than ever before.

Ana T. Forrest is an internationally recognized pioneer in yoga and emotional healing. The creator of Forrest Yoga, she is a contributing expert to Yoga Journal and other leading Asian and European wellness publications. Forrest teaches worldwide at yoga conferences, workshops, retreats, and teacher trainings.

 



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