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« Week of February 9, 2014 »
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9
Start: 1:00 pm

Today’s increasingly busy lifestyles can make enjoying whole-grains and natural, seasonal foods in the morning seem like a challenge, forcing many of us to rely on store-bought yogurts, sugary prepared cereals, and other fast but not so healthy choices. Luckily, Megan Gordon’s Whole-Grain Mornings: New Breakfast Recipes to Span the Seasons ($22.00) offers a beautifully illustrated collection of sixty-five wholesome and inventive breakfast recipes that are so easy and convenient they are perfect for any day of the week. Seasonal recipes like Greens and Grains Scramble and Strawberry Rhubarb Quick Jam complement breakfast staples like Whole-Grain Pancake Mix and The Very Best Oatmeal. Natural sweeteners top tasty fare, such as infused honey drizzled over Rosemary Apricot Oatcakes, and a variety of homemade yogurts make even the staunchest avoider of breakfast eager to pull up a chair.

Featured throughout is an inspiring account of the author’s own personal journey, from her business success as the founder of Marge Granola and her relocation from San Francisco to Seattle, to stories of nostalgia and new-found love. Whether one is thumbing through the pages to savor the stories or just looking for a simple, easy-to-follow guide to the most important meal, Whole-Grain Mornings is a delightfully nourishing way to start the day.

Megan Gordon is a writer, recipe developer and culinary educator living in Seattle, WA. She writer regularly for the Kitchn and on her blog "A Sweet Spoonful." Her work has appeared in numerous national magazines including Better Homes and Gardens, Ready Made Magazine and the Edible publications. When not writing about food, Megan operates runs Marge, the granola company she founded in 2010. Marge Granola is distributed nationally and has been recognized by the Wall Street Journal, Sunset Magazine and Whole Living. Visit her blog at www.asweetspoonful.com.

 

Start: 4:00 pm

Mykonos After Midnight ($14.95) is the fifth and latest in the fast paced Chief Inspector Andreas Kaldis series

Mykonos holds tight to its past even as it transforms from an obscure, impoverished Aegean island into a tourist mecca and summertime playground for the world's rich, a process making the Mykonian people some of the wealthiest in Greece.

A legendary nightclub owner, has been found savagely bludgeoned in his home. All evidence points to obvious thugs. Yet the murder has put long hidden, politically explosive secrets in play and drawn a dangerous foreign investor to the island paradise. Andreas Kaldis, feared head of Greece's special crimes division, is certain there's a far more complex solution to the murder than robbery, and he vows to find it.

His quest for answers cuts straight into the entrenched cultural contradictions that give Mykonos so much of its magic and soon has him battling ruthless opportunists preying on his country's weakened financial condition. Kaldis learns there is a high, unexpected price to pay for his curiosity as he becomes locked in a war with a powerful, clandestine international force willing to do whatever it takes to change and wrest control of Mykonos, no matter the collateral damage. Such is global crime. And the need for a wily hero to stand against it.

Jeffrey Siger was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He practiced law at a major Wall Street law firm and while there served as Special Counsel to the citizens group responsible for reporting on New York City's prison conditions. He left Wall Street to establish his own New York City law firm and continued as one of its name partners until giving it all up to write full-time among the people, life, and politics of his beloved Mykonos, his adopted home of thirty years. When not in Greece, he enjoys his other home, a farm outside New York City.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

Award-winning author Willy Vlautin demonstrates his extraordinary talent for confronting issues facing modern America, illuminated through the lives of three memorable characters who are looking for a way out of their financial, familial, and existential crises, in his heartbreaking and hopeful fourth novel The Free ($14.99).

Leroy Kervin is a 31 year old Iraqi War veteran living with a traumatic brain injury. Unable to dress or feed himself, or cope with his emotions, he has spent the last seven years in a group home. There he spends his days watching old sci-fi movies until he awakens one night with a clear mind and memories of his girlfriend.

Freddie McCall is a middle aged father working two jobs. He's lost his wife and kids, and is close to losing his house. He's buried in debt, unable to pay the medical bills from his daughter's childhood illness. As Freddie's situation becomes more desperate he undertakes a risky endeavor he hopes will solve his problems but could possibly end in disaster.

Pauline Hawkins takes care of everyone else around her. She cares for her mentally ill father out of a deep sense of obligation. As a nurse at the local hospital, she treats her patients and their families with a familiar warmth and tenderness. When Pauline becomes attached to a young runaway, she learns the difficult lesson that you can't help someone who doesn't help themselves.

The lives of these three characters intersect as they look for meaning in desperate times. Willy Vlautin covers themes ranging from health care to the economic downturn and housing crisis, to the toll war takes on veterans and their families. The Free is an extraordinary portrait of contemporary America and a testament to the resiliency of the human heart.

Born and raised in Reno, Nevada, Vlautin started playing guitar and writing songs as a teenager and quickly became immersed in music. It was a Paul Kelly song, based on Raymond Carver's Too Much Water So Close to Home that inspired him to start writing stories. He is the author of three well recieved novels, The Motel Life, which has been made into a movie starring Dakota Fanning, Emile Hersh, and Stephen Dorff; Northline, and Lean on Pete, which won two Oregon Book Awards. He is a founding member of the alternative country band Richmond Fontaine, who have produced eight studio albums.

 

10
Start: 1:00 pm
Introduction by Jane Ganahl
 
In French Women Don’t Get Facelifts: The Secret of Aging with Style and Attitude ($25.00), Mireille Guiliano, author of the bestselling French Women Don’t Get Fat, shares the secrets and strategies of aging with attitude, joy, and no surgery. Readers learn proactive ways to look and feel great.
 
Start: 1:00 pm
End: 3:00 pm

5 Mon.: Feb. 10, Mar. 10, Apr. 7, May 12, & June 9 • 1:00-3:00pm • $105

 

 

Carol Benet has been teaching her popular classes on literary awards for 22 years at Book Passage. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley, where she won an Outstanding Teaching Award. She also received an M.A. in French Literature from the University of Michigan.

Reading List:

February:  City of Bohane, Kevin Barry ($15.00) - Impac Dublin Literary Award

March: The Hunger Angel, Herta Mueller ($16.00) - Nobel Prize Winner

April: Restless, William Boyd ($16.00) - Costa Award-formerly Whitbread

May: Spilt Milk, Chico Buarque ($15.00) - Premio Jabuti and Portugal Telecom Awards

June: Tenth of December, George Saunders ($15.00) - Pen/Saul Bellow Award

 

 

Start: 6:00 pm

Left Coast Writers® Event

Join the Left Coast Writers® as they celebrate Undercover Love: Lust, Literature, and Lingerie. What our world needs is a lot more love. Of course in these busy days, it might be hard to find the elusive amour, let alone bask in its healing influence. So we provide the antidote for modern, time- and love-starved lives.

 

Start: 7:00 pm
End: 9:00 pm
Four Mondays, Feb. 10, Feb. 24, Mar. 31 & Apr. 28 • 7:00-9:00 pm • $95
 
 
 
We’ll have an intimate conversation with the authors of: “the major, soul-searching biography that Leonard Cohen deserves” (NY Times); an adventurous yet deep, decades-long look into the beauty and violence, history, cultures, and vanishing natural splendor of Central America; an ingeniously designed “tour de force” (George Saunders) mystery set in high-tech San Francisco; and the “riveting” (Pat Conroy), heartbreaking tale of 40 years in the hardscrabble lives of a small-town Tennessee family. Pamela Feinsilber is a writing consultant and book editor: pamelafeinsilber.com.
 
Feb. 10: I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen, Sylvie Simmons $16.99
Feb. 24: Maya Roads: One Woman’s Journey Among the People of the Rainforest, Mary Jo McConahay $16.95
Mar. 31: Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, Robin Sloan $15.00
Apr. 28: The Lost Saints of Tennessee, Amy Franklin-Willis $15.00
  
Start: 7:00 pm

In the 1980s Jimmy Rabbitte formed the Commitments, a ragtag, blue-collar collective of Irish youths determined to bring the soul music stylings of James Brown and Percy Sledge to Dublin. Time proves a great equalizer for Jimmy as he’s now approaching fifty with a loving wife, four kids, and a recent cancer diagnosis that leaves him feeling shattered and frightened.

Jimmy still loves his music, and he still loves to hustle—his new thing is finding old bands and then finding the people who loved them enough to pay for their resurrected albums. As he battles his illness on his path through Dublin, Jimmy manages to reconnect with his own past, most notably Commitments guitarist Liam “Outspan” Foster and the still beautiful backup vocalist Imelda Quirk. Jimmy also learns the trumpet, reunites with his long-lost brother, and rediscovers the joys of fatherhood.

An immensely funny and poignant novel, The Guts ($27.95) captures friendship, family, the power of music, the specter of death, and the zeal for life.

Roddy Doyle is the author of nine novels, two short story collections, and a nonfiction book. In 1993 he won the Booker Prize for his novel Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha. His 1991 novel, The Van, was a Booker Prize finalist. He lives in Dublin.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm
End: 9:00 pm

5 Mon.: Feb. 10, Mar. 10, Apr. 7, May 12, & June 9 • 7:00-9:00pm • $105

 

 

Carol Benet has been teaching her popular classes on literary awards for 22 years at Book Passage. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from UC Berkeley, where she won an Outstanding Teaching Award. She also received an M.A. in French Literature from the University of Michigan.

Reading List:

February:  City of Bohane, Kevin Barry ($15.00) - Impac Dublin Literary Award

March: The Hunger Angel, Herta Mueller ($16.00) - Nobel Prize Winner

April: Restless, William Boyd ($16.00) - Costa Award-formerly Whitbread

May: Spilt Milk, Chico Buarque ($15.00) - Premio Jabuti and Portugal Telecom Awards

June: Tenth of December, George Saunders ($15.00) - Pen/Saul Bellow Award

 

 

11
Start: 10:30 am
End: 12:30 pm

5 Tuesdays: Feb. 11, Mar. 11, April 8, May 13, & June 10 • 10:30-12:30pm • $105

 

 

Pat Holt leads a discussion of books that have captured the contemporary imagination. Holt is the former book review editor of the San Francisco Chronicle and publisher of Holt Uncensored. 

Reading List: 

Feb.: A Tale for the Time Being, Ruth Ozeki $16.00

Mar.: City of Women, David Gillham $16.00

Apr.: Me, Who Dove Into the Heart of the World, Sabina Bergman $15.00

May: Pigeon English, Stephen Kelman $13.95

June: The Garden of Evening Mists, Tan Twan Eng $15.99 

 

 

Start: 1:00 pm

Dept. of Speculation ($22.95) is a portrait of a marriage. It is also a beguiling rumination on the mysteries of intimacy, trust, faith, knowledge, and the condition of universal shipwreck that unites us all.

Jenny Offill's heroine, referred to in these pages as simply "the wife," once exchanged love letters with her husband postmarked Dept. of Speculation, their code name for all the uncertainty that inheres in life and in the strangely fluid confines of a long relationship. As they confront an array of common catastrophes-a colicky baby, a faltering marriage, stalled ambitions-the wife analyzes her predicament, invoking everything from Keats and Kafka to the thought experiments of the Stoics to the lessons of doomed Russian cosmonauts. She muses on the consuming, capacious experience of maternal love, and the near total destruction of the self that ensues from it as she confronts the friction between domestic life and the seductions and demands of art.

With cool precision, in language that shimmers with rage and wit and fierce longing, Jenny Offill has crafted an exquisitely suspenseful love story that has the velocity of a train hurtling through the night at top speed. Exceptionally lean and compact, Dept. of Speculation is a novel to be devoured in a single sitting, though its bracing emotional insights and piercing meditations on despair and love will linger long after the last page.

Jenny Offill is the author of the novel Last Things, which was chosen as a Notable Book of the Year by the New York Times and was a finalist for the L.A. Times First Book Award. She is the coeditor, with Elissa Schappell, of two anthologies of essays, The Friend Who Got Away and Money Changes Everything. Her children's books include 17 Things I'm Not Allowed to Do Anymore, 11 Experiments That Failed, and Sparky. She teaches in the writing programs at Queens University, Brooklyn College, and Columbia University.

 

Start: 6:00 pm

Third-generation farmer Gary Romano, owner of Sierra Valley Farms, speaks from experience about today's most vital issues: how to live with purpose and how to protect our food supply. In Why I Farm: Risking It All for a Life on the Land ($15.00), Romano documents a disappearing way of life and issues a wake-up call, describing his metamorphosis from a small boy growing up on a farm to an adult white-collar worker and his ultimate return to the land. If you've ever wanted to claim a patch of earth, this book offers hard-earned counsel about small farming in the twenty-first century. Part memoir, part call to action, Romano details the challenges and joys of living off the land, what's at stake, and why this way of life must be protected for future farmers.

After a childhood spent pulling weeds and planting seeds, Gary Romano received a master's degree in recreation administration from California State University, Chico, and worked as a park ranger and county park administrator before returning to the farm.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm

One Book One Marin Launch

An unforgettably charming memoir, Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer ($16.00) is full of hilarious moments, fascinating farmer's tips, and a great deal of heart. When Novella Carpenter—captivated by the idea of backyard self-sufficiency—moved to inner city Oakland and discovered a weed-choked, garbage-strewn abandoned lot next door to her house, she closed her eyes and pictured heirloom tomatoes and a chicken coop. The story of how her urban farm grew from a few chickens to one populated with turkeys, geese, rabbits, ducks, and two three-hundred-pound pigs will capture the imagination of anyone who has ever considered leaving the city behind for a more natural lifestyle.

Novella Carpenter grew up in rural Idaho and Washington State. She went to University of Washington in Seattle where she majored in Biology and English. She studied under Michael Pollan for two years while attending Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism. Her writing has appeared on Salon.com, Saveur.com, and sfgate.com (the San Francisco Chronicle's website), and in Food & Wine and Mother Jones.  She lives in Oakland, California.

 

 

12
Start: 6:00 pm

In conversation with Tiffany Baker

Love Water Memory ($16.00) is a bittersweet masterpiece filled with longing and hope, Jennie Shortridge’s emotional novel explores the raw, tender complexities of relationships and personal identity.

Who is Lucie Walker? Even Lucie herself can’t answer that question after she comes to, confused and up to her knees in the chilly San Francisco Bay. Back home in Seattle, she adjusts to life with amnesia, growing unsettled by the clues she finds to the selfish, carefully guarded person she used to be. Will she ever fall in love with her handsome, kindhearted fiancé, Grady? Can he devote himself to the vulnerable, easygoing Lucie 2.0, who is so unlike her controlling former self? When Lucie learns that Grady has been hiding some very painful secrets that could change the course of their relationship, she musters the courage to search for the shocking, long-repressed childhood memories that will finally set her free.

Jennie Shortridge has published five novels: Love Water Memory, When She Flew, Love and Biology at the Center of the Universe, Eating Heaven, and Riding with the Queen. When not writing, teaching writing workshops, or volunteering with kids, Jennie stays busy as a founding member of Seattle7Writers.org, a collective of Northwest authors devoted both to raising funds for community literacy projects and to raising awareness of Northwest literature.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm
McKenzie Funk has spent the last six years reporting around the world on how we are preparing for a warmer planet. In Windfall: The Booming Business of Global Warming ($27.95) Funk shows us that the best way to understand the catastrophe of global warming is to see it through the eyes of those who see it most clearly—as a market opportunity.

Funk visits the front lines of the melt, the drought, and the deluge to make a human accounting of the booming business of global warming. By letting climate change continue unchecked, we are choosing to adapt to a warming world. Containing the resulting surge will be big business; some will benefit, but much of the planet will suffer. McKenzie Funk has investigated both sides, and what he has found will shock us all. To understand how the world is preparing to warm, Windfall follows the money.
 
McKenzie Funk is a journalist whose work has appeared in Harper’s, National Geographic, Rolling Stone, GQ, Outside, and The New York Times. A National Magazine Award and Livingston Award finalist and the winner of the Oakes Prize for Environmental Journalism, he was a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan, where he studied economics and systems thinking. He lives in Seattle with his wife and son.
 
 
 
13
Start: 6:00 pm

Eileen Cronin’s Mermaid: A Memoir of Resilience ($26.95) is a gorgeously crafted memoir about resilience, family, and forging your own way, written by a woman born without legs. Reflecting with grace and humor on her youth, search for love, and quest for answers that pitted her against her mother, Cronin spins a shimmering story of self-discovery and transformation.

 

Start: 7:00 pm

In All Joy and No Fun ($26.99), award-winning journalist Jennifer Senior isolates and analyzes the many ways in which children reshape their parents' lives, whether it's their marriages, their jobs, their habits, their hobbies, their friendships, or their internal senses of self. She argues that changes in the last half century have radically altered the roles of today's mothers and fathers, making their mandates at once more complex and far less clear. Recruiting from a wide variety of sources-in history, sociology, economics, psychology, philosophy, and anthropology-she dissects both the timeless strains of parenting and the ones that are brand new, and then brings her research to life in the homes of ordinary parents around the country. The result is an unforgettable series of family portraits, starting with parents of young children and progressing to parents of teens. Through lively and accessible storytelling, Senior follows these mothers and fathers as they wrestle with some of parenthood's deepest vexations-and luxuriate in some of its finest rewards. 

Jennifer Senior is a contributing editor at New York Magazine, where she writes profiles and cover stories about politics and social science. She has been a frequent guest on NPR and numerous television programs, including Charlie Rose, The Chris Matthews Show, Hardball, Morning Joe, Washington Journal with Brian Lamb, CNN/American Morning, and NBC/Today. She is a regular contributor to the New York Times Book Review. She lives in New York with her husband and young son.

 

 

Start: 7:00 pm

In Conversation with Amber Kelleher- Andrews

I'm telling you why we broke up, Ed. I'm writing it in this letter, the whole truth of why it happened.

Why We Broke Up
($15.00) tells the story of Min Green and Ed Slaterton. They are breaking up. Min is writing Ed a letter and giving him a box. Inside the box is why they broke up. Two bottle caps, a movie ticket, a folded note, a box of matches, a protractor, books, a toy truck, a pair of ugly earrings, a comb from a motel room, and every other item collected over the course of a giddy, intimate, heartbreaking relationship. Item after item is illustrated (art by Maira Kalman) and accounted for, and then the box, like a girlfriend, will be dumped.

Daniel Handler has written three novels under his own name, including The Basic Eight, Watch Your Mouth, and Adverbs, and many books under the name Lemony Snicket, including All the Wrong Questions, A Series of Unfortunate Events, and the picture book 13 Words. He was dumped at least three times in high school.

Maira Kalman has written and illustrated many books, such as And the Pursuit of Happiness, The Principles of Uncertainty, Looking at Lincoln, Fireboat, and with Lemony Snicket, 13 Words. Her heart was broken in high school first by a boy who looked like Bob Dylan and shortly thereafter by one who looked like Leonard Cohen.

Amber Kelleher-Andrews serves as a matchmaker on Ready for Love, NBC's innovative and dramatic new relationship show about making real connections. Kelleher-Andrews is an internationally renowned relationship expert and matchmaker. A host for her radio talk show, The Rules of Engagement, her topics touch on matters of the heart, where Kelleher-Andrews' unique expertise provides insight into the challenges of dating in the modern world.

 

14
Start: 10:30 am
End: 12:30 pm

5 Fridays: Feb. 14, Mar. 14, April 11, May 16, & June 13 • 10:30-12:30pm • $105

 

 

Pat Holt leads a discussion of books that have captured the contemporary imagination. Holt is the former book review editor of the San Francisco Chronicle and publisher of Holt Uncensored. 

Reading List: 

Feb.: A Tale for the Time Being, Ruth Ozeki $16.00

Mar.: City of Women, David Gillham $16.00

Apr.: Me, Who Dove Into the Heart of the World, Sabina Bergman $15.00

May: Pigeon English, Stephen Kelman $13.95

June: The Garden of Evening Mists, Tan Twan Eng $15.99

 

15
Start: 10:00 am
End: 2:00 pm

Sat., Feb. 15 • 10:00-2:00pm • $60

Class is full - please register for next month

48-hour advance registration • Limit of six

You’ve written a brilliant story and can’t wait to hear what others think. You’re stuck and need a critique. What to do? Bring your manuscript, or even just an idea, to this on-thespot workshop, and we’ll critique it. Amy Novesky is a children’s book editor, author, and experienced workshop leader.

 

 

Start: 10:00 am
End: 4:00 pm

Sat., Feb. 15 • 10:00 - 4:00pm • $105

 

 

Class Credit: Participants in this class may receive credit at Dominican University: bookpassage.com/dominican-credit

Adair Lara shows all the elements of the memoir: the arc, reflective voice, scene vs. narrative, fact vs. truth, and writing about family members. She shows what it takes to get published. There will be in-class exercises. Writers of fiction and essays are welcome. A former San Francisco Chronicle columnist, Lara is the author of twelve books, including Naked, Drunk and Writing, her guide to essay and memoir.

 

 

 

 

Start: 1:00 pm

The author of Bird in Hand and The Way Life Should Be delivers her most ambitious and powerful novel to date: a captivating story of two very different women who build an unexpected friendship: a 91-year-old woman with a hidden past as an orphan-train rider and the teenage girl whose own troubled adolescence leads her to seek answers to questions no one has ever thought to ask

Nearly eighteen, Molly Ayer knows she has one last chance. Just months from "aging out" of the child welfare system, and close to being kicked out of her foster home, a community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping her out of juvie and worse. Vivian Daly has lived a quiet life on the coast of Maine. But in her attic, hidden in trunks, are vestiges of a turbulent past. As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly discovers that she and Vivian aren't as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

The closer Molly grows to Vivian, the more she discovers parallels to her own life. A Penobscot Indian, she, too, is an outsider being raised by strangers, and she, too, has unanswered questions about the past. As her emotional barriers begin to crumble, Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life - answers that will ultimately free them both.

Rich in detail and epic in scope, Orphan Train ($14.99) is a powerful novel of upheaval and resilience, of second chances, of unexpected friendship, and of the secrets we carry that keep us from finding out who we are.

Christina Baker Kline is the author of five novels, including The Way Life Should Be and Bird in Hand. She lives outside of New York City with her husband and three sons, and spends as much time on the coast of Maine as possible.

 

 

Start: 4:00 pm

It may be taboo to say, but some groups in America do better than others. Mormons have recently risen to astonishing business success. Cubans in Miami climbed from poverty to prosperity in a generation. Nigerians earn doctorates at stunningly high rates. Indian and Chinese Americans have much higher incomes than other Americans; Jews may have the highest of all.

Why do some groups rise? Drawing on groundbreaking original research and startling statistics, The Triple Package:How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America ($27.95) uncovers the secret to their success. A superiority complex, insecurity, impulse control—these are the elements of the Triple Package, the rare and potent cultural constellation that drives disproportionate group success. The Triple Package is open to anyone. America itself was once a Triple Package culture. It’s been losing that edge for a long time now.

The Triple Package has a dark underside too. Each of its elements carries distinctive pathologies; when taken to an extreme, they can have truly toxic effects. Should people strive for the Triple Package? Should America? Ultimately, the authors conclude that the Triple Package is a ladder that should be climbed and then kicked away, drawing on its power but breaking free from its constraints.

Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld are professors at Yale Law School. Chua, one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people in the world in 2011, is the author of Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, which unleashed a firestorm debate about the cultural value of self-discipline, as well as the bestselling World on Fire. Rubenfeld examined the political dangers of “living in the moment” in Freedom and Time; he is also the author of the international bestseller The Interpretation of Murder.

 

 



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