Pushing Past the Night: Coming to Terms with Italy's Terrorist Past (Paperback)

By Mario Calabresi, Michael Moore (Translator), Roger Cohen (Introduction by)
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Description


December 15, 1969, was the most important day of Mario Calabresi's life, although he would not be born for another year. On that date, the anarchist Giuseppe Pinelli fell to his death from a window at the Milan police headquarters, where he was being questioned about his role in the Piazza Fontana massacre, the most infamous episode of domestic terrorism in Italy.
Police Inspector Luigi Calabresi, Mario's father, was in the building, though not in the room, at the time of the accident. This didn't stop the rumors that Pinelli had been killed by Calabresi. These suspicions kicked off "a ferocious lynching, albeit in slow motion"--as the Italian paper "La Repubblica" characterized it--that culminated in the murder of Luigi Calabresi outside his home one morning in 1972. Calabresi left behind his pregnant wife and two young sons.
In this memoir, Mario Calabresi explores the personal and political fallout of Italy's era of domestic terrorism in a poignant and very personal account. His grief at the murder of his father is balanced by a desire to overcome the divisions that still scar Italy today. This powerful book calls not only for accountability but also for redemption. As Mario Calabresi's mother always told him, you have to look to the future, stake your bets on life, and refuse to be a prisoner of hatred.

About the Author




Michael Moore was born in Flint, Michigan, and attended Catholic schools, including a year in the seminary, which he says accounts for his healthy respect for the fires of hell which seem to be located somewhere just outside Crawford, Texas.

He was an Eagle Scout, Newspaper Boy of the Week, and the youngest person ever elected to public office in the state of Michigan when he was 18-years old.

Michael Moore is now the Oscar and Emmy-winning director of the groundbreaking and record-setting films "Roger & Me, Bowling for Columbine, " and "Fahrenheit 9/11" (which also won the top prize at this year's Cannes Film Festival and has gone on to become the highest grossing documentary of all time.)

No Disney film this year has made as much at the box office as "Fahrenheit 9/11." It became the first documentary ever to premier at number one in the box-office in its opening weekend. Film Comment has called it "The Film of the Year."

Michael Moore is also America's #1 selling nonfiction author with such books as "Stupid White Men and Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation, " and "Dude, Where's My Country." No other author has spent more weeks on the "New York Times" hardcover non-fiction list in the past two years than Michael Moore. "Stupid White Men" was also awarded Britain's top book honor, "British Book of the Year," the first time the award has been bestowed on an American author.

Michael now has two new books being published by Simon & Schuster: "Will They Ever Trust Us Again -- Letters from the War Zone, " which is a compilation of letters he has received from soldiers in Iraq and from their families back home; and "The Official Fahrenheit 9/11 Reader, " which contains loads of backup materials for the film, plus essays, and the film's screenplay.

In addition to winning the Academy Award for "Bowling for Columbine, " Michael Moore won the Emmy Award for his NBC and Fox series, "TV Nation" and was also nominated for his other series, "The Awful Truth" (which the "L.A. Times" called "the smartest and funniest show on TV.")

Michael Moore also wrote and directed the comedy feature "Canadian Bacon" starring the late John Candy, and the BBC documentary, "The Big One." He has directed music videos for R.E.M., Rage Against the Machine, Neil Young, and System of a Down.

His other best-selling books include "Downsize This! Random Threats from an Unarmed American, " and "Adventures in a TV Nation, " which he co-wrote with his wife Kathleen Glynn. His books have been translated in over 30 languages, and have gone to #1 in Italy, Germany, France, Japan, Great Britain, Australia, Ireland, and New Zealand.

Michael currently spends his time reading, gardening, and removing George W. Bush from the White House.



ROGER COHEN is a columnist for the "New York Times", where he has worked since 1990: as a correspondent in Paris and Berlin, and as bureau chief in the Balkans covering the Bosnian war, for which he was cited for excellence by the Overseas Press Club. He was named foreign editor on 9/11, overseeing Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage in the aftermath of the attack. His previous books include "Soldiers and Slaves" and "Hearts Grown Brutal". He lives in London.

Praise For…


“They killed Mario Calabresi’s policeman father when he was only two years old, and growing up he found in this tragedy the force to write. In trying to understand his own grief, he comprehends the grief of an entire country.”—Roberto Saviano, author of Gomorrah

“With a remarkably beautiful translation into English by Michael F. Moore, Calabresi weaves back and forth between the 1970s and the present day, illustrating the lack of justice for Italy's criminals and the falsehoods in the national consciousness surrounding the death of his father. To debunk the claims made by leftists that his father was guilty of a crime, Calabresi carefully and scientifically has many experts recreate the events of the death of Giusseppe Pinelli, leading to the solid conclusion that Luigi Calabresi is innocent of all wrongdoing…What I appreciate so much about this work is Calabresi’s ability to create such rich emotion while retaining his own values and morals.”—Stephen Robert Morse, Mother Jones

“Fair and deeply moving.”—Le Monde

"Mario Calabresi has written, for all the victims, a worthy book.”—Télérama

“Sincere without being vindictive, Mario Calabresi . . . struggles against ignorance and conformity.”—Nouvel Observateur

Product Details
ISBN: 9781590513002
ISBN-10: 1590513002
Publisher: Other Press (NY)
Publication Date: October 6th, 2009
Pages: 133
Language: English