Little Dorrit (Hardcover)

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Description


Amy Dorrit's father is not very good with money. She was born in the Marshalsea debtors prison and has lived there with her family for all of her twenty-two years, only leaving during the day to work as a seamstress for the forbidding Mrs. Clennam. But Amy's fortunes are about to change: the arrival of Mrs. Clennam's son Arthur, back from working in China, heralds the beginning of stunning revelations not just about Amy but also about Arthur himself.
Of the complex, richly rewarding masterworks he wrote in the last decade of his life, "Little Dorrit" is the book in which Charles Dickens most fully unleashed his indignation at the fallen state of mid-Victorian society. Crammed with persons and incidents in whose recreation nothing is accidental or spurious, containing, in its picture of the Circumlocution Office, the most witheringly exact satire of a bureaucracy we possess, "Little Dorrit" is a stunning example of how thoroughly Dickens could put his flair for the theatrical and his comic genius the service of his passion for justice.
(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)

About the Author


Arguably one of the greatest writers of the Victorian era, Charles Dickens is the author of such literary masterpieces as A Tale of Two Cities (1859), A Christmas Carol (1843), David Copperfield (1850), and The Adventures of Oliver Twist (1839), among many others. Dickens' s indelible characters and timeless stories continue to resonate with readers around the world more than 130 years after his death. Dickens was born in 1812 and died in 1870.

Delmore Schwartz (1913-1966) was born and raised in Brooklyn. One of America's greatest poets and short-story writers, Schwartz contributed "In Dreams Begin Responsibilities" to the first issue of "Partisan Review" in 1937. Schwartz taught at Syracuse, Princeton, and Kenyon College, and received the Bollingen Prize in 1959. After a difficult period of alchoholism and depression, he died of a heart attack in 1966.

Praise For…


“One of the most significant works of the nineteenth century.”—Lionel Trilling

Product Details
ISBN: 9780679417255
ISBN-10: 0679417257
Publisher: Everyman's Library
Publication Date: December 15th, 1992
Pages: 896
Language: English