The Metamorphosis (Mass Market Paperbound)

By Franz Kafka, Stanley Corngold (Editor), Stanley Corngold (Translator)
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Description


"When Gregor Samsa woke up one morning fromunsettling dreams, he found himself changed in hisbed into a monstrous vermin." With thisstartling, bizarre, yet surprisingly funny firstsentence, Kafka begins his masterpiece, "TheMetamorphosis." It is the story of ayoung man who, transformed overnight into a giantbeetlelike insect, becomes an object of disgrace tohis family, an outsider in his own home, aquintessentially alienated man. A harrowing -- thoughabsurdly comic -- meditation on human feelings ofinadequecy, guilt, and isolation, "TheMetamorphosis" has taken its place as oneof the mosst widely read and influential works oftwentieth-century fiction. As W.H. Auden wrote, "Kafka is important to us because his predicamentis the predicament of modern man.

About the Author


Franz Kafka was born in 1883 in Prague, where he lived most of his life. During his lifetime, he published only a few short stories, including The Metamorphosis, The Judgment, and The Stoker. He died in 1924, before completing any of his full-length novels. At the end of his life, Kafka asked his lifelong friend and literary executor Max Brod to burn all his unpublished work. Brod overrode those wishes.

Stanley Corngold is a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at Princeton University and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His highly acclaimed translations include Kafka's Selected Stories. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Stanley Corngold is a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at Princeton University and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His highly acclaimed translations include Kafka's Selected Stories. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey.

Praise For…


“Kafka’s survey of the insectile situation of young Jews in inner Bohemia can hardly be improved upon: ‘With their posterior legs they were still glued to their father’s Jewishness and with their wavering anterior legs they found no new ground.’ There is a sense in which Kafka’s Jewish question (‘What have I in common with Jews?’) has become everybody’s question, Jewish alienation the template for all our doubts. What is Muslimness? What is femaleness? What is Polishness? These days we all find our anterior legs flailing before us. We’re all insects, all Ungeziefer, now.”
—Zadie Smith
 
“Kafka engaged in no technical experiments whatsoever; without in any way changing the German language, he stripped it of its involved constructions until it became clear and simple, like everyday speech purified of slang and negligence. The common experience of Kafka’s readers is one of general and vague fascination, even in stories they fail to understand, a precise recollection of strange and seemingly absurd images and descriptions—until one day the hidden meaning reveals itself to them with the sudden evidence of a truth simple and incontestable.”
—Hannah Arendt 

Product Details
ISBN: 9780553213690
ISBN-10: 0553213695
Publisher: Bantam Books
Publication Date: February 1972
Pages: 224
Language: English